Tag Archive for: teacher

Dearest students and teachers all over the world,

Hi, hello, how are you? Are you healthy and safe? We sure hope you do.

How’s online classes? Is everything going smoothly? Are you bored and tired of the situation?

We know things are different right now during the pandemic. Social and physical distancing are a must, after all. However, don’t lose hope just yet!

School might be different, because it has to be online. You might not be able to meet your friends and peers face-to-face, but the fact that you can still meet each other online is a blessing in itself. So, do your best in class!

For students: please respect your teachers! Online classes have not been easy for them as well. At least, pay attention to their explanation and respond to them. Put on proper clothes and sit properly. Turn on your camera if you can, so that the teachers know who’s behind the screen listening to their explanation.

For teachers: please do your best in teaching! We know that it might be difficult to have restrictions when you’re teaching. It must be difficult to be confined into a screen while having to convey difficult materials to your students. However, it is not right if you just give students a ton of homeworks instead of actually explaining the materials to them. Find ways in which you can actually teach your students effectively. Remember, these childrens are the future of our nation.

At last, we hope everyone will continue to take education seriously. Don’t forget that, sometimes, education is a privilege, but also put your health first and foremost before anything else. If learning online has become overwhelming, don’t be afraid to seek help.

Please stay happy, healthy, and safe! 

With concern,

Team Project Child Indonesia

Written by Graciella Stephanie Ganadhi, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

Education Over Pandemic

Written by Nindy Silvia Anggraini, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

The level of the spread of Covid-19 which is increasingly fierce has made community activities seem to stop. The social distancing policy makes public places closed, including schools. The implementation of Pembelajaran Jarak Jauh (PJJ) policy is an alternative for all schools in Indonesia to be able to carry out teaching and learning activities. Various virtual learning features are developed and used by teachers and students to keep interacting and learning. But the government forgot that Indonesia is not a country with a population that has an equal economic status. There are still many who are less fortunate and cannot enjoy online learning facilities. Based on data from the Central Statistics Agency in 2019, internet penetration rates in rural areas are at an average of 51.91%, and in urban areas, they average 78.08%. The ownership of computers, which is an important medium for learning, is very low. In rural areas as much as 9.93%, while in urban areas as much as 28.43%. The Ministry of Education and Culture realizes that learning will not be optimal due to uneven facilities. The government has done this by providing PJJ broadcasts on TVRI and RRI, but that has not reached some regions yet. Their hopes in reaching knowledge seemed to bud because it was limited to learning facilities. Of course, this needs more attention from the Indonesian government

However, the problem is not an obstacle for teachers and students who are less fortunate with extraordinary enthusiasm. There is already a lot of information about teachers who go from house to house of their students who do not have access to online learning both television and the internet. They deliver learning materials following the curriculum to each student like a private course. Things like this need to be appreciated. Not just giving material to students, but there is a struggle and a burning passion there. Not to mention the distance between student homes that are not close is a big challenge. This is the picture of the educators needed by our nation today. Teachers become the second window of knowledge for students after books in the field of formal education. For those of us who are currently able to sit comfortably enjoying online learning facilities, shouldn’t we appreciate it with a higher enthusiasm for learning?

Reference

https://www.bbc.com/indonesia/maj alah-52642997

https://www.kompas.com/tren/read/2020/04/18/140342165/kisah-pak-guru-avan-mengajar-dari-rumah-ke-rumah-karena-siswa-tak-punya?page=all

Help the Teachers in Need

Story by Graciella Stephanie Ganadhi, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

It’s been three months since I am stuck at home, preferring not to go out rather than risking my health amids the coronavirus pandemic. I am very lucky to be able to stay home and continue my learning online. Since my university shut down its offline classes last March, online classes had been in full swing. My lecturers, although not many of them are internet savvy, have been able to conduct online classes without any difficulties.

Unfortunately, not all teachers, lecturers, and students are lucky. Many out there are unable to gain access to an electronic device, more or less accessing the internet. As students, it might be difficult to continue learning, but for teachers and lecturers, the inability to access the internet might cost them their life. There are many stories out there about teachers and lecturers that are not a permanent part of the educational institution. They work as contract workers, so there is not much compensation from the school or even the government if they lose their job.

These teachers are considered as public servants. They work to serve the public: students. Without them, many students would not be able to get an education at all. If children don’t get proper education, what will they become in the future? 

Teachers are vital to the education field, but also they are the ones who are hit the hardest during this pandemic. With the shift in learning methods and their situation of not being able to access the internet, there isn’t much hope for them. If they stop teaching, they immediately lose their source of income.

As privileged citizens, it is time for us to pay back our teachers. They volunteer to teach the future of our nations, it is only fair for us to support their efforts too. There are ways in which we can help:

  1. Write to the government

As individuals, we cannot do much to change the lives of those contract teachers. However, as an institution, the government surely can. We can always use our voice in this democratic nation to help increase the chance of livelihood for those teachers.

  1. Donate, donate, donate!

There’s always a chance for you to do good through donations. This is one of the open donations that you can donate your money to: https://kitabisa.com/campaign/santunanguruhonorer. No matter how much your donation is, it will always be useful and what’s wrong with sharing your blessings, right?

If you ever feel like you don’t have anything to do with the fate of those contract teachers, just remember the face of your favorite teacher. The one who helped you during your school years and educated you to be who you are today. Imagine if the fate of your favorite teacher is the same as those contract teachers, would you still be quiet about it? As a functioning member of society, you have received kindness that your teachers gave to you, now it is time for you to share those kindnesses.

Reference: