Posts

Eyes Wider on Extreme Weather

written by Adides Gideon Simanjuntak, Stephanie Ruth Armida, Rafy Ramadhan: Content Writer Interns at Project Child Indonesia

Have you noticed the extreme weather conditions around us lately? Recently, our country has been hit by the Tropical Cyclone Seroja in East Nusa Tenggara and West Nusa Tenggara. It is one of many other natural disasters we have had. Indonesia has had 197 natural disasters between January 1 and January 23, 2021, according to the Indonesian National Board of Disaster Management (BPNB) (Fardah, 2021). This phenomenon also happens in other countries. For example, the Australian wildfires that happened last year which were caused by heat waves. Early in this month, Germany just had late-season snow in April (Washington Post, 2021). What is actually going on and why is it happening? 

Extreme Weather due to Climate Change

Remember about global warming? It’s just getting worse. The increasing greenhouse gas emission (GHG) due to the overuse of fossil fuel, deforestation, and industrial factory farming (Causes of Climate Change, 2017) has caused earth temperature to increase. It led to climate change and triggered extreme weather– an unpredictable weather that occurs greater than its range in the past (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2005). 

The Impact of Extreme Weather

Extreme weather triggers heavy downpours, droughts, floods, storms, heat waves, and hurricanes. Met Office (2018) explained that it happens due to the unstable situation of the atmosphere and the rising temperature of the sea. These will bring negative impacts not only to our environment, but also to the economy and social sector. 

For the environment, extreme weather might reduce the ecosystem’s capability in absorbing carbon; hence, increasing the quantity of carbon in the atmosphere (The Weather Channel, 2013). Drought is one of the most damaging extreme weather in this context, because as trees and plants die, there will be nothing to absorb carbons. Hence, the extreme weather will be even worse. Drought also puts living creatures in danger.

Drought also brings death to plants and it surely disturbs the ecosystem. The danger is not limited on the land, as the rising temperature in the sea will also disturb the marine ecosystem. This results in the loss of biodiversity of flora and fauna. It can also increase health risks to humans (What Are the Effects of Climate Change?, n.d.). Extreme weathers like floods and unpredictable hurricanes can even cause casualties in a short amount of time.

Economy and social wise, the destruction of agriculture, infrastructure, productivity and other fields may threaten our economy and social life as well. Losing our land and water due to extreme weather can lead to food insecurity, affecting not only the local people but also to the market. This can result in economic problems including the loss of jobs while our government has to spend money to aid the affected.

Every Cloud Has Silver Lining, Including COVID-19 

Though the current pandemic has brought so many problems into the world, it has also brought a good impact that shows us that reducing climate change is possible. If the climate change issue is solved, extreme weather will disappear on its own. Dwortzan (2021) said that many countries are showing great reductions on GHG due to less transportation activity, decreasing usage of fossil fuels and sustainable sources of foods. For the first time in forever, the world has been put into rest. It shows us that our actions matter in light of fighting climate change.

Our Actions Shape Our World

Even our smallest actions can make a big difference. We can start making changes by reflecting about our daily activities. For instance, we can try paying attention to our eating habits. Make sure that we eat and buy food responsibly to minimize food waste. Believe it or not, food waste also has its part in emitting  greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. You can also try growing your own food by doing urban farming. You can grow your own vegetables even in a minimum space, for example on your garden or rooftop. 

Regarding energy consumption, we can start using energy more mindfully. We can start in our house by plugging off our charger after using, eating outside less, and minimizing electricity consumption. We can also take public transportation if possible to reduce the usage of fossil fuels.

Last but not least, do not hesitate to spread awareness about these issues to your friends! Sharing your eco-friendly behavior can inspire others to act on our world, and together we can make our world a better place.

“Harmony makes small things grow, lack of it makes great things decay”

-Sallust

References

Days After Historic Warmth, Europe Braces for Shocking Blast of Cold, Snow. (2021, April 5). Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2021/04/05/europe-cold-blast-snow/

Can Extreme Weather Make Climate Change Worse? | The Weather Channel – Articles from The Weather Channel | weather.com. (2013, August 15). The Weather Channel. https://weather.com/science/environment/news/can-extreme-weather-make-climate-change-worse-20130815#:%7E:text=The%20researchers%20have%20shown%20that,to%20remain%20in%20the%20atmosphere.

Causes of climate change. (2017, June 28). Climate Action – European Commission. https://ec.europa.eu/clima/change/causes_en#:%7E:text=Humans%20are%20increasingly%20influencing%20the,greenhouse%20effect%20and%20global%20warming

Dwortzan, M. (2021, January 29). How will Covid-19 ultimately impact climate change? MIT News | Massachusetts Institute of Technology. https://news.mit.edu/2021/how-will-covid-19-ultimately-impact-climate-change-0129

Fardah. (2021, February 6). Indonesia enters 2021 with “abnormal” natural disasters. Antara News. https://en.antaranews.com/news/167468/indonesia-enters-2021-with-abnormal-natural-disasters

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2005). Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Web.Archive.Org. https://web.archive.org/web/20051101154444/http://www.grida.no/climate/ipcc_tar/wg1/088.htm

Met Office. (2018, December 13). How is climate linked to extreme weather? https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/climate/climate-and-extreme-weather

What are the effects of climate change? (n.d.). Www.Myclimate.Org. Retrieved April 16, 2021, from https://www.myclimate.org/information/faq/faq-detail/what-are-the-effects-of-climate-change/

Overcoming Medical Waste Problem during the Pandemic

Written by Adides Gideon Simanjuntak, Rafy Ramadhan, Stephanie Ruth Armida: Content Writer Interns Project Child Indonesia

It has been more than a year since we have our ‘14 days quarantine’. Who would have thought that the pandemic would stick around for such a long time? Just imagine all the medical waste we have produced up until now! If we do not pay any attention to medical waste, it will cause us problems in the future. Let us see what medical waste actually is, what are the problems caused by it, and what we can do to help!

What is Medical Waste?

According to WHO, Medical Waste can be classified as waste that is generated with the body fluids/contact with human beings or animals. Masks, gloves, hazmat suits, and other used medical devices from COVID-19 testings are the common examples of medical waste that has increased during the pandemic. Medical waste comes not only from hospitals, but also from households. Everyone produces medical waste, including us. 

Problems Arise

As the number of COVID-19 patients keeps getting higher each day, the number of PPEs (Personal Protection Equipments) used is also getting higher. This results in more medical waste produced. Unfortunately, our country hasn’t been able to handle it very well. Due to COVID-19, medical waste in Indonesia has reached 6.417,95 tons as of February 4th, 2021.

Right now, our country is facing problems from several dimensions:

  • Environmental
    • Most PPEs contain polypropylene, polyurethane, polyacrylonitrile, polyethylene, and polyethylene terephthalate, chemicals that make it harder to break down. The fragmentation of it will not only harm the land, but also the water ecosystems in rivers and the sea.  They can tangle and poison animals such as fish and birds that live near water. 
    • PPEs will release toxins if they are burned in the open, causing air pollution. Medical waste such as these has to be incinerated to kill the dangerous elements in it. However, even Incinerators cause pollution, meaning more health problems to the respiratory system and the skin. 
    • Landfills are overwhelmed by medical waste. The degradation process of medical waste can release the toxic chemicals to an open environment which can be hazardous to people around the area. 
  • Social

Because rivers are now heavily polluted with medical waste, families who rely their lives  on rivers are at risk. For example, residents who depend on the Cisadane river for their daily necessities are now scared of using the water because it’s too dangerous (Keck, 2020). Workers who rely on waste picking are also impacted because they have to be in contact with the medical waste; hence, they have a bigger risk of catching the virus. 

  • Economic

To save our country, our government has to work on solutions, and they definitely cost a lot of money. For example, they are building new incinerator plants, and while the government is working on those, they also have to spend more on third-parties in order to let hospitals use their incinerators to burn medical waste.

The Good News

You can a little be at ease, because our government and other bigger parties surely are working on the solutions for our medical waste problems. One of them is that our government is cooperating with cement factories by using their kilns as incinerators. In the meantime, Rosa Vivien Ratnawati, the Director-General for Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste and Hazardous Substances Management at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia stated in one of Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)’s webinar last year that the government is currently focusing on building five new incinerators this year and a total of 32 incinerators within the next five year.

Another solution comes from LIPI. They are working on an environmentally-friendly method which is called recrystallization. It even produces recycled plastics with higher purity, as explained by Sunit Hendrana (2021), one of the researchers in LIPI. 

Lastly, our government also utilizes autoclaves, a sustainable tool to manage medical waste. It sterilizes medical waste using heat from pressured steam. WHO is working with our Ministry of Environment and Forestry and in collaboration with UNDP on building four autoclaves in hope that it can help solve the lack of incinerators in the country.

What Can We Do to Help?

There are many things we can do to help our environment, and they are very simple! Starting off small, we can reduce disposable mask consumption by wearing a double cloth mask or reusable mask such as the N95 mask. It might seem trivial, but if everyone does it, we can eventually reduce huge numbers of domestic medical waste. Also, in case you are unsure what to do with your medical waste, you can disinfect them simply by soaking in bleach/detergent before disposing of them at your nearest public health center (hospitals, clinics) where they can help you with better medical waste management. Remember, even the smallest thing can bring a huge impact if done by a lot of people. Stay safe and stay kind to our environment!

References:

Keck, M. (2020, September 7). COVID-19 Medical Waste Is Heavily Polluting This River in Indonesia. Global Citizen. https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/covid-19-medical-waste-Cisadane-river/

Lembaga Ilmu Pengetahuan Indonesia. (2021, January). Rekristalisasi, Solusi Daur Ulang Sampah Medis. http://lipi.go.id/berita/single/Rekristalisasi-Solusi-Daur-Ulang-Sampah-Medis/22316

Rikin, A.S. (2020, April 22). KLHK Akan Bangun 5 Insinerator Tahun Ini. Bisnis.com. https://ekonomi.bisnis.com/read/20200422/99/1230996/klhk-akan-bangun-5-insinerator-tahun-ini

World Day for Safety and Health at Work 2021: Ensuring Workers’ Safety and Health amidst Pandemic

Written by Safira Tafani Cholisi, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

Have you ever heard of the term Occupational Safety and Health (OSH)? As specified in the Promotional Framework for Occupational Safety and Health Convention, 2006 (No. 187), it aims to build a system that can guarantee the safety and health of workers in the workplace. OSH risks may present themselves in a range of forms, but a set of new emerging risks are brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

With the pandemic, the workplace becomes a new hotspot for possible virus transmissions. Mitigation measures to address this threat are altering the common methods and practices of workers. One of them is the transition to a work-from-home policy that aims to reduce the number of workers present on-site while maintaining work productivity through long-distance communication and coordination.

This transition is of course without its own challenges. Quarantine and work-from-home policies have observably seen new consequences of its implementation such as psychosocial risks and violence. Working from home without the familiarity of a workplace setting and its defining characteristics like work desk and colleagues can potentially lead to stress, anxiety, and depression. Domestic violence has also reportedly increased during the pandemic quarantine as one of the manifestations of psychosocial stress faced by workers.

OSH risks amidst the pandemic can be even more threatening for workers in developing countries. 80% of workers in developing countries are estimated to be exposed to global occupational hazards (Khan, 2013). With the prevalence of the informal economy sector, many do not have access to secure and guaranteed social safety nets, including healthcare. A number of individuals had to continue working in risky environments as they had no other options to make a living. At the same time, OSH framework development in developing countries continues to be ignored in policymaking (Nuwayhid, 2004).

The International Labour Organization (ILO) first initiated the World Day for Safety and Health at Work on April 28, 2003 to highlight the problems of occupational accidents and diseases as well as to promote its prevention. This year’s World Day for Safety and Health at Work adopts the title of “Anticipate, Prepare and Respond to Crises” and “Invest Now in Resilient Occupational Safety and Health Systems”, which calls for an immediate and proper response to OSH risks caused by the pandemic (World Day for Safety and Health at Work 2021, 2021).

As individuals, we can contribute to the prevention of OSH risks by being responsible to our own roles in the workplace. We can remind our colleagues, friends and family, and our surrounding environment to work safely and know one’s work rights. We can also contribute to movements and campaigns that call out and challenge unsafe and inhumane practices in workplaces. Additionally, we can exercise our right as a citizen to demand our government to provide policy and legal framework that can ensure the safety and health of workers. 

As the pandemic continues to loom over, we can continue to collaborate with one another to do good and spread kindness as much as we can.

References

Khan, M., 2013. Developing a Safety Culture in Developing Countries. In: International Conference on Safety, Construction Engineering and Project Management (ICSCEPM 2013). [online] Islamabad. Available at: <https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276488208_Developing_a_Safety_Culture_in_Developing_Countries> [Accessed 27 April 2021].

Nuwayhid, I., 2004. Occupational Health Research in Developing Countries: A Partner for Social Justice. American Journal of Public Health, 94(11), pp.1916-1921.
International Labour Organization (ILO). 2021. World Day for Safety and Health at Work 2021. [online] Available at: <https://www.ilo.org/global/topics/safety-and-health-at-work/events-training/events-meetings/safeday2021/lang–en/index.htm> [Accessed 27 April 2021].

World Earth Day 2021: Protect the Environment, Restore Our Earth

Written by Safira Tafani Cholisi, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

It is widely known that climate change has been one of the most pressing issues of our world. Environmental degradation poses a threat to the balance of the global ecosystem that involves all kinds of living beings, whether it be plants, animals, and human beings. The deterioration of the environment also threatens the livelihoods of many, particularly those most socioeconomically marginalized and vulnerable. To address this problem, various actors across sectors have taken action and collaborated to collectively build a comprehensive response that can counter the effects brought about by climate change. Among these actors, private individuals and non-governmental organizations are some who have contributed to the mainstreaming of climate change discourse.

World Earth Day was first celebrated on April 22, 1970, to bring awareness to the precarious state the Earth was in. It aims to gather people across the world to unite in acknowledging the importance of preserving the Earth and tackling the problems leading to environmental degradation and climate change. Ever since the day has been celebrated every year with various actions and movements to protect the Earth.

The 2021 theme for World Earth Day is “Restore Our Earth”. It signifies the collective belongingness we have with one another and the Earth as well as our responsibilities to restore the balance in our environment.

A few ways which you can do to participate in this year’s World Earth Day are:

  1. Educating one’s self on environmental issues

There are different environmental issues based on various factors and concepts, and sometimes it is difficult to be informed of everything at the same time. During this year’s World Earth Day, you can join online discussions and webinars which aim to discuss various perspectives and ways in which environmental degradation and climate change threaten our Earth. For instance, the World Earth Day organizers will be holding a virtual youth summit and inviting various youth climate activists.

  1. Rearranging room or house and identifying pattern of consumption

World Earth Day is also the perfect time for you to identify your own daily consumption pattern. You can rearrange your house and room and observe whether you have been using any items with unsustainable materials or those that take up a lot of energy. This is also a chance for you to see if you have been overconsuming by buying or hoarding items that end up being unused and left collecting dust in the corner of your room. Cleaning up your own space can also mean taking out the trashes and recycling those based on the suggested sustainable guidelines.

  1. Connecting with nearby communities

No movement will ever progress forward without the help and collaboration of a tight-knit community. World Earth Day can be a time for you to connect with nearby environmental organizations or events that aim to combat the effects of climate change. Some of the events that usually take place during World Earth Day are tree planting, community clean-up, sustainability workshops, and other hands-on activities as a first-hand method to protect the environment. Joining one of these wouldn’t only give you a new network of people who care about the same issue as you do, but also space for you to contribute to preserving the Earth.

There are still many other ways for you to take action during World Earth Day, but remember the most important thing: everyone can do good, and protecting our Earth is also one way to realize it!

References

EARTHDAY.ORG. 2021. Earth Day 2021. [online] Available at: <https://www.earthday.org/earth-day-2021/> [Accessed 19 April 2021].

Berbagi Bersama Project Child Indonesia di Bulan Ramadhan

Ditulis oleh Safira Tafani Cholisi, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

Ramadhan segera tiba! Bulan Ramadhan adalah masa yang begitu dinantikan oleh setiap pengikut agama Islam di seluruh pelosok dunia. Dalam bulan ini, setiap Muslim akan menunaikan ibadah puasa selama satu bulan penuh. Di akhir bulan Ramadhan, hari raya Idul Fitri akan menyambut umat-umat Islam yang telah menunaikan ibadahnya secara penuh dan taat. Namun, tidak hanya tentang berpuasa, bulan Ramadhan yang disebut sebagai bulan suci ini memiliki keindahan dan berkahnya tersendiri.

Tentu istilah dan kegiatan berbagi tidak dapat dipisahkan dari bulan Ramadhan. Tidak jarang kita temukan acara-acara seperti buka bersama, bagi-bagi takjil, sahur on the road, dan kegiatan-kegiatan lainnya yang khas di Ramadhan. Bagi umat Muslim, bulan Ramadhan adalah saat untuk berlomba-lomba melakukan dan menyebarkan kebaikan untuk mendapat pahala yang berlipat-lipat, termasuk dengan berbagi kepada sesama. Selain itu, membagi kebahagiaan bersama orang lain juga memiliki banyak manfaat bagi kita dan sekitar.

Berbagi dengan orang lain berarti kita ikut berpartisipasi dalam melindungi lingkungan dan masyarakat sekitar. Sebuah studi menunjukkan bahwa berbagi dapat menstimulasi produksi endorfin dan dopamin di otak yang berhubungan dengan perasaan diapresiasi dan bahagia (Harbaugh, Mayr & Burghart, 2007). Studi lain juga menemukan bahwa orang-orang yang sering berbagi cenderung memiliki perasaan bahagia dan bersyukur yang lebih tinggi dibanding mereka yang jarang berbagi dengan murah hati (Meier & Stutzer, 2007). Selama bulan Ramadhan ini, ada banyak cara bagi kita untuk menyalurkan dan berbagi kebahagiaan dengan sekitar.

Salah satunya adalah berbagi dengan anak-anak sekolah yang mengalami kesulitan dalam pembelajaran selama pandemi COVID-19. Akibat protokol kesehatan untuk menjaga jarak dengan satu sama lain, anak-anak sekolah harus belajar dari rumah menggunakan perangkat elektronik. Tidak semua keluarga memiliki kemampuan finansial yang memadai untuk menyediakan kebutuhan perangkat elektronik dan paket data internet yang bisa memenuhi keperluan anak untuk sekolah. Selain itu, keadaan ekonomi juga terkadang mengurangi waktu yang dapat diberikan oleh orang tua untuk mengawal dan membantu proses pembelajaran anak dari rumah.

Apakah kamu ingin berbagi bersama Project Child Indonesia? 

Project Child Indonesia sedang mengadakan penggalangan dana untuk Online Learning Assistance (OLA) bagi anak-anak program Sekolah Sungai yang mengalami kesulitan pembelajaran selama pandemi. Program ini bertujuan untuk memfasilitasi kegiatan pendampingan belajar anak-anak oleh para relawan, baik secara daring maupun luring. Project Child Indonesia juga akan menyediakan materi belajar untuk mata pelajaran matematika, sains, dan bahasa Inggris sesuai dengan level kelas masing-masing anak.

Jika ingin berbagi bersama Project Child Indonesia, silahkan melakukan donasi di halaman Kitabisa kami!

Selain itu, Project Child Indonesia juga menerima donasi berupa gawai bekas dan penggalangan dana untuk memberikan paket data internet kepada semua anak di tiga komunitas Sekolah Sungai.

Tentu bulan Ramadhan adalah bulan yang paling dinanti-nanti sebagai ajang untuk menebarkan kebaikan pada sesama. Seperti apa yang kami yakini, we believe that everyone can do good, and of course you too!

Referensi

Harbaugh, W., Mayr, U., & Burghart, D. (2007). Neural Responses to Taxation and Voluntary Giving Reveal Motives for Charitable Donations. Science, 316(5831), 1622-1625. doi: 10.1126/science.1140738
Meier, S., & Stutzer, A. (2007). Is Volunteering Rewarding in Itself?. Economica, 75(297), 39-59. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-0335.2007.00597.x

Soft Skills: Essentials in Life feat. Mikha & Thoriq

Written by Mikhael Sianturi, Content Writer Intern of Project Child Indonesia

All of us are familiar with distinctive skills or talents that people possess. There are those who can play guitar, those who can make a precise fillet cut on a salmon, those who are capable of whistling really well, and more. However, there are those with unsung skills that not everyone necessarily knows. These skills are soft skills. 

Soft skills are basically interpersonal skills that one possesses to help them in workplace situations involving other individuals. They are really significant considering many workplaces involve other individuals to get the job done. Seeing the vast variety of workplace situations and the people in them, soft skills will really come in handy.

How do we learn these skills? Unfortunately, soft skills are one of those things that can only be learnt best in the field. A non-profit organization is certainly a good example, as our fellow intern and volunteer expressed in their interviews. We’ve asked questions regarding their soft skills practice to both Mikha (intern in Partnership department) and Thoriq (volunteer in OLA program) and here are their thoughts!

A New Experience and Adaptability

Project Child Indonesia is a non-profit organization, which brings differences to the table that both Mikha and Thoriq had to adapt to. It is either in the form of the people in organization, the people outside of the organization, the tasks, and more!

Of course, to adapt means to learn-even from mistakes. For Mikha, PCI is a great place for him to ‘grow’. For his case, Mikha grew from the new tasks that he had to deal with being an intern in the Partnership department. “I have once made an error in forming the budget proposal of a program. It was an uncharted area for me. Not just that, to propose a proposal, to deal with PCI policies… However, with some corrections from my superior, I learnt how to do things properly.”

Mistakes are to take place often in the process of learning. However, aside from that element, there’s the challenge itself. For Thoriq, a volunteer in our Online Learning Assistance, it was the people. 

“Obviously, in this program, I had to work with new people. There are the interns themselves and the kids that I have to teach. In the process of teaching itself, I had to position myself in a position to understand and teach the kids well. So, I did. With that, the learning process was actually not one-sided. I also learnt along as well by teaching.”

Aside from the people, Thoriq also encountered other challenges as well. It may not sound like much, but weather can really affect the process of engaging the OLA program. “When it rained during the days when we’re supposed to go to the field, changes were necessary. Either we had to change the location of the class, or the time of the class, things like that. However, teamwork really can make wonders in this kind of situation.” 

Honing the Existing Skills

Both Mikha and Thoriq arrived in PCI already possessing a few skills on their own. However, as the two continuously work in the respective positions, they are enhancing their skills as well. 

For Thoriq, a lot of his existing skills are being honed during his time in the organization. When shown a set of soft skills and asked which ones are being put into use and growing in his time in the organization, Thoriq pointed to all of them. “Communication, organization, teamwork, punctuality, critical thinking, interpersonal communication, adaptability, all of them are put into practice while working in the program. Especially… Communication, teamwork, and adaptability.” 

As for Mikha, it is pretty much the same story. His time interning in Project Child Indonesia has helped him grow as a person. “From what I experience, I feel that all of them are being used. The work here requires a lot of teamwork, communication, thinking, and of course, an on-time manner.”

In the end, the two interviewees agree that PCI is a great place to learn and practice soft skills. Both Mikha and Thoriq shared a message for those who are looking to apply for an internship or job, not necessarily in PCI, but in every other opening.

Thoriq highlighted the importance of a role in a world of career and its requirements that you must fulfill. “Know your qualifications, jump into it, and do it. Commitment is also a must.”

Mikha also highlighted the same thing. “There will always be a position for you. That position will be the one that matches you the most, so make sure that it really does.”

World Health Day 2021: Building a Fairer, Healthier World for Everyone

Written by Vina Dina, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

World Health Day is held every year on 7 April with different themes. It’s aimed to create awareness of a specific health theme to highlight a priority area of concern for the World Health Organization (WHO). This year, to celebrate World Health Day, WHO started a campaign to build a fairer, healthier world.

Referring to what WHO mentions on their website, this campaign started because nowadays, our world is an unequal one. As Covid-19 has highlighted, some people might have easy access to health services. On the other hand, some groups find it difficult to get access to health services due to their little income, have little or no access to safe environments, facing gender inequality, etc. Moreover, the difficulty to access the health services can lead to unnecessary suffering, illness, and premature death.

Isn’t it ironic? While some people have good health facilities with easy access, eat their favorite foods, and sleep comfortably in their house, other people are suffering from hunger, safety and illness.

Health is a right, not a privilege

Even though health services is something necessary, unfortunately it is not easily accessible by everyone. In Indonesia itself, health facilities and human resources in health services are not evenly distributed. For instance in East Indonesia, the number of health facilities and human resources in health services are more limited than the west. Research shows that the number of medical specialists and advanced health facilities such as hospitals or clinics are unequally distributed (Misnaniarti et al., 2017).

These problems are unfair, but preventable. That’s why WHO has started this campaign and called on leaders to ensure that everyone lives and works in conducive conditions to good health and able to access health services anytime and anywhere they need them.

Fairer health services consist of so many aspects. Nowadays, as the distribution of the Covid-19 vaccine begins, we can start sharing more information and awareness about the vaccine. It’s our job to oversee the Covid-19 vaccine is evenly distributed and accessible to all people. Besides, we need to educate people about the importance of Covid-19 vaccine because 42,2% of people in this country do not believe in Covid-19 vaccine (Indonesian Survey Institute, 2021).

Health is a right, not a privilege. Hence, everyone should be able to get access to health services whenever and wherever they need it. We can maximize the use of social media to share awareness and informations about fairer health service and end the discrimination and exclusion. Furthermore, we can influence others to join WHO’s campaign and expand the information. With courage and willingness to build a fairer and healthier world for everyone around us, we can start a small step to make this happen. Small steps will lead to bigger action, isn’t it?

Another thing we can do if we have free time and “willingness” is volunteering. We can volunteer in various organizations either government organizations or non-government organizations in the health sector to help people get their right of health. You can find the organizations on indorelawan.org or join the nearest organizations in your region. Besides helping others, you can also get useful experiences that will certainly help you in the future.

We also can contribute to build a fairer and healthier world for everyone by donating to fundraising that focuses on the health sector. In most cases, the donation will be distributed to help people personally or to improve health services in areas that are rarely reached by the government. Or maybe, you want to start your own organizations and fundraising? It would be great!

We believe everyone can do good, including you. No matter what way you choose, or how big the steps that you take, it still gives an impact to our world. The future is in your hands. 

Source:

https://www.liputan6.com/news/read/4489806/survei-lsi-424-persen-masyarakat-tak-percaya-vaksin-covid-19

Misnaniarti et al. 2017. Ketersediaan Fasilitas dan Tenaga Kesehatan Dalam Mendukung Cakupan Semesta Jaminan Kesehatan Nasional. Jurnal Penelitian dan Pengembangan Pelayanan Kesehatan. 1(1)

Put Children’s Perspective about Diversity through Tolerance Ambassador Project

Written by Theresia Tyas Thea Kirana, Program Coordinator Intern Project Child Indonesia

Do you ever wonder how the world looks like when humans are all the same? We have the same skin colors, same hairstyle, same body shapes, or even the same belief. Close your eyes. Visualize that on your mind. Take a reflective moment for a second. Do you feel weird? Okay, stop visualizing it and get back to our reality, where people from a whole lot of different backgrounds are living on the same planet Earth and we are one of them. I am one of those different people, and you are one of them, too. It is heartbreaking to see people disliking or even bullying and harming others who are not from the same background as them. What is the root of those wicked actions? Are we born with the feeling of hating things or people that are different from us?

According to the argument stated in the United Nation article on International Day for Tolerance which says that people are naturally diverse; only tolerance can ensure the survival of mixed communities in every region of the globe. As a global commitment, International Day for Tolerance is observed annually on 16 November since 1995 to promote tolerance. Project Child Indonesia (PCI) supported and celebrated the diversity among its workers and the beneficiaries by seeing the differences as something powerful that can make people do something good, one action is by making a project called The Child Ambassador for Tolerance.

PCI, as an NGO that works with children and people from the riverside communities, wants to see and educate the children living in Sekolah Sungai communities about the importance of diversity and how to cherish our differences in ethnicity, race, and religion. Thankfully, the matters happen to be the same thing as Williams-Sonoma Indonesia (WSI) has been campaigning about social justice, and the WSI inspired by Sekolah Sungai Program. Therefore PCI and WSI collaborate and initiate this project in September-October 2020.

The weekly mentoring classes were conducted for four weeks and closed with ceremony and campaign activities. In the beginning of the project, the volunteers got a chance to meet Dr. Diah Kusumaningrum, one of the lecturers in International Relations Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM), to understand more about what tolerance is about and how to persuade children to be aware and understand about tolerance and diversity from their own experiences. This activity is a training activity to prepare volunteers to become facilitators before going to the field.

The implementation of this project involves 5 (five) child representatives from each location to be fostered as ambassador. Four weeks mentoring classes accompanied by facilitators simultaneously in three river communities. During each class, the volunteers and the children were discussing the experiences they are facing in daily activities related to living in a diverse community. They also met some invited people from Rote, Ambon, and Central Sulawesi. Through the meeting with three different people from different backgrounds, we encourage the children to ask anything about diversity and experience by themselves about another culture. Later, the children made some posters related to the knowledge they have gained during the project, they also practiced the message of their poster in front of the other children and volunteers. The mentoring class activities concluded with a closing ceremony and on-site campaign in each river and digital campaign for the public.

If there is one thing that we can learn from this project, as one of the invited persons said, prejudice is learned and not inevitable. Children can learn and relearn about toleration, it is the environment that shapes our being as a human to have our own perspective. Our perspective may vary, but the key is to celebrate and embrace diversity and use it as our tool to live our best life with other people. As the tagline of this project says, let’s do each other’s favor by “Menyayangi, Berempati, Wujudkan Harmoni!”

Reference:

https://www.un.org/en/observances/tolerance-day

PCI as An Organized Act of Kindness

Written by Dyah Prajnandhari, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

There is a common belief that to succeed, you have to grab whatever chance you have, or else it would be someone else’s. This belief makes us unaware that each individual has a competitive relationship and slowly gets too caught up with our stuff. We may forget that we live as human beings and we’re not living alone. As you may be competitive with everything, you can take a step back to look around you and do a considerate act for someone. Check up on your friend, pay your friend a meal, or tell your mom that you love her.

Kindness is one of the crucial habits that is encouraged in Project Child. People may do kindness in spontaneous ways, such as smiling to strangers, holding a door to strangers behind them, or saying thank you to a barista after they make you a coffee. We don’t always plan for kindness, and we do it because we want to do it. However, in Project Child, we try to do an organized act of kindness. This means we always do kindness to society in an organized way so that we can have an impact on them.

Doing kindness in an organized way means we have to prepare the agents of the event. Interns and volunteers are one of the essential aspects of it. Therefore on Friday, 21 February 2020, we have Kak Surayah Ryha, the Executive Director of Project Child Indonesia, to present the importance of doing kindness in an arranged way.

In this rare chance with Kak Aya, she motivated the interns to be the significant agents to always be helpful for the people around us while not forgetting that we have the capability to do it in a well-organized way, not just doing it without good planning. One inspiring story she told the interns, “A few years ago, we had clothes that were given by exchange students. We think we can distribute to the people who need them. We were giving them freely, but it turned out so bad. We didn’t use our capability to think that we have a more organized way to help them. She then recalled that it was a success after she and her team changed the plan. “We ended up selling them at a very low price, and we included the children in this event. They learned how to bear responsibility, the parents could get what they wanted, and we succeeded in giving kindness that we want.”

Even though it is not always easy to do kindness in an organized way, PCI believes that at least everyone can do good. It also becomes a reminder for us to step back from whatever we are doing right now and look for around you.

International Youth Day : The Future Is Us

Written by Nindy Silvia Anggraini, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia 

International youth day is celebrated for some reason. Young people whose enthusiasm is very easy to ignite, are directed to good things that are useful for their environment. The theme for International Youth Day 2020, “Youth Involvement for Global Action” seeks to draw on how young people interact at the local, national and global levels in national and multilateral institutions and processes, as well as lessons from how their representation and interaction in formal institutional politics can be of particular interest. significant. With this theme, we as young people are invited to be active in our environment in positive terms starting from the regional scope, namely the local community. The existence of NGOs which support the running of government activities with civil society and other organizations is one of the most appropriate places for young people to build bangs. As the title says, the future is us, young people. NGOs can be described as a “global network of opportunities”. NGOs are at the forefront of international action. Throughout history, when the Government has hit a dead end, NGOs have worked to solve it. Relentless advocacy helps support an international ban on landmines and cluster munitions. Your relentless urge to value gender equality, climate, and human rights. Once the influence of NGOs, it proves that through NGOs we can together build our nation for the better future.

The involvement of young people in NGOs has recently continued to increase as advanced technology can easily bring crucial issues to the surface. Youth movement through NGOs and the like to prove their participation in government whose main goal is to develop the country. Issues that are considered by the government, such as human rights, education, racism, the environment, and many more, are now starting to be discussed frequently and have even become the main discussion in government. The words “the future is us” are no longer nonsense. What we do as young people today will determine the future of our nation. For that, let our environment be active in the complex in our respective environment. Whether we choose to sleep, have fun, or just dive right into the problems around us, the tools we will get later. The word “young people” has the connotation of “making change” not “waiting for change”. So what are you waiting for?