Posts

Pasar Mandiri Code – Project Child Indonesia

On 3rd November 2018, Project Child Indonesia held Pasar Mandiri at Sekolah Sungai Code. It’s one of our most anticipated event at Sekolah Sungai, and the children of Sekolah Sungai Code were very excited in preparing and taking part in Pasar Mandiri.

The original idea of Pasar Mandiri or Sustainable Market, is to allow the riverside community to take part in the process of education for the children at our Sekolah Sungai. In Pasar Mandiri, Project Child Indonesia provides second-hand goods, with great quality and affordable price to sell. The prices range from IDR 1.000 to IDR 10.000. This affordable price range allows the community member of Code to buy all the things that they need. The money that we collected from Pasar Mandiri will directly goes to our educational field-trip for the children.

During this event, we also involved the children of Sekolah Sungai Code directly. They helped to sell, bargain and promote the clothes, bags and shoes to the community member. We involved the children on this event, because Project Child Indonesia aims to raise awareness towards the children about working hard to achieve their dreams. We want the children to understand and put their effort for what they want. And through Pasar Mandiri, they learn about this. They learn that for their educational trip, which they also get to participate in deciding the trip that they want, they have to put some effort in making it happen.

The event start at 09.00 until 12.00, around 50 people came and participated in Pasar Mandiri. We would like to thank all of our kind donors and volunteers for making this program possible.

Satu Hari Mendongeng bersama Anak Indonesia

In the celebration of Sumpah Pemuda, on 28th October 2018 Project Child Indonesia with DESA (Developing Rural Area by Social Activities) in collaboration with Kita Beraksi, 1000 Guru Jogja, and Yogyakarta Mengajar held an event called “Satu Hari Mendongeng Anak Indonesia” in one of our river school, Gadjahwong. The event was initiated as an effort to raise awareness about the importance of literacy in children’s life. The event combined interesting storytelling and games in order to give inspirations for the children that books can be interesting too.

The event was successfully held at 09.00 until 11.30, and was divided into two session of storytelling. The first session was a general storytelling, then on the second session the children were divided by their age group and they listened to another story. Around 27 children came and took part in this event. Instantly, they were captivated and mesmerized by the stories. They were passionate in listening and watching the storytelling.

After the first and second session, the children were given some questions regarding of the stories that they’ve just heard. The children were very enthusiastic in answering questions about the story. The question and answer session were followed with giving out the door prizes. Project Child Indonesia gave out books and school essentials for the children that could answer the questions about the stories.

At the end of the event, in the spirit of celebrating Sumpah Pemuda, the children and volunteers recited the youth pledge. Then the children received tumbler from a generous donation by Travel Lover Yogyakarta. We were so happy to conduct this event in our river school, Gadjahwong. We want to thank you for the communities that took part in our event. We hope to see similar events on other school also!

General Medical Checkup at Code

On 26th October 2018, Project Child Indonesia held an event called “General Medical Check-up for Kids” in one of our River School area, Code. The event was held to help the kids to be aware about their health, and to teach them about basic health. The event was initiated by Australian pediatrician, Dr. Monika Tasoni. During her stay in Yogyakarta Dr. Monika Tasoni contacted Project Child Indonesia, as she wants to do voluntary work and community service to help the children.

The event was successfully held at 14.00 until 17.30, just right after the children finished their school. On that day, around 28 children came and take part in the medical checkup. Dr. Monika Tasoni was helped by two undergraduate medical students from Universitas Gadjah Mada. They helped the doctor to communicate with the children. Most of the problems that the doctor encountered in Code is cavities. Fortunately, Dr. Monika Tasoni came prepared with toothbrushes and toothpastes for the children. The children were very excited as they received a brand new toothbrush set. Later on that day, Dr. Monika Tasoni demonstrated and taught the children the proper way of brushing their teeth. She also reminds them to always brush their teeth three times a day. Thanks to the doctor, the children were very enthusiastic and happy to learn the importance of brushing their teeth.

The event was also enlivened by the participation of PPSMB Universitas Gadjah Mada. Around 10 first year students of Universitas Gadjah Mada, came and helped out the event by entertaining the children. They also gave generous donation of stationaries for the children.

We are happy and grateful for the generous gestures of the people that really cared to help our community. We hope this event could inspire a lot of people to take part in their society. We also hope to see similar event to be held in other river school community!

 

Green Teachers of Today: Towards a Green Generation of Indonesia

A seminar and workshop by PCI with the mission of promoting better environmental education

With the current condition of the earth, it has become increasingly important that we teach the younger generation to understand and care for the environment. It is essential that children nowadays grasp the importance of living a sustainable lifestyle- otherwise the environmental problems they face will just get worse and worse.

Like with any other life skills, teaching children involves all layers of society, namely: their homes, schools, and the community.

The government has recognize that environmental education, formally known as Pendidikan Lingkungan Hidup, is an important topic to be taught at schools, and has thus introduced the Adiwiyata program, which conducts environmental education in formal schools. This program was first introduced in 1975 by IKIP Jakarta, limited to only a small number of schools in the capital city. Now, this program is run all over the country, with most public schools actively implementing or at least aware of this program to some level.

Although this is a national program which is regulated by the Ministry of the Environment, a lot of schools are still struggling with it. With that in mind, Project Child Indonesia (PCI) held a seminar and workshop titled “Guru Hijau Jaman Now: Menuju Generasi Indonesia Hijau” (Green Teachers of Today: Towards a Green Generation of Indonesia). In this event, PCI invited 45 elementary school teachers from around Yogyakarta to participate. The seminar invited 3 speakers: a representative from the Center of Environmental Studies UGM, and headmasters from SDN Bhayangkara Yogyakarta and SDN Giwangan Yogyakarta- both who have much improved the implementation of Adiwiyata in their schools. The seminar  was aimed to provide the teachers with a deeper understanding of the urgency of environmental education, and also the basics of Adiwiyata implementation. The workshop was held as a focus group discussion (FGD) which was geared towards understanding the teachers’ perception of the Adiwiyata program. The aim was to gather insight from the teachers which could be used as feedback to the Environment Agency who runs the program.

From the FGD, we understood that most teachers still found the Adiwiyata program challenging. Most teachers generally understand that environmental education is important, but translating that into classroom activities for elementary children is tough. Even though the government has provided guidelines for the curriculum, they feel that it is not specific enough and it very much requires the teachers to be creative and to actively search for ideas and materials for the class. Since most elementary school teachers do not have a formal background in environmental education, this becomes a big challenge. Another problem is that not all teachers have received the guideline or necessary information to effectively deliver the program. While some teachers are able to find different ways of integrating the material in their everyday lessons, some teachers have never even read the lesson plan for the Adiwiyata Program.

The seminar and workshop was able to provide the teachers with a space to learn from each other and share their troubles. Although the Adiwiyata Program has much potential to be a program that will have a significant impact towards the future of the environment and the next generation of Indonesians, a lot of work still needs to be done. We hope that this short experience will motivate the teachers to better implement the Adiwiyata Program, while also being a reminder for the government to improve their planning and systems related to this program.

Batch 27: The Beginning of Project Based Learning

Welcoming the 27th batch has been an enthralling experience for Project Child Indonesia, especially the river school program. Running as the oldest program in PCI, our excitement never worn out to welcome new volunteers and interns who are ready to help children in our community sites. The first meetings of each river school were prepared to introduce the new volunteers to the children. Games and fun activities arranged by them aimed to be bonding occasions during the early introductory class, before they jump to Project Based Learning.

Project Based Learning (PBL) has been an approach we choose to nurture and spark children’s critical thinking and social awareness. This batch, PBL approach is tailored to current SS condition which not only the volunteer but also the children who come voluntarily to our river schools. As the result, the number of students is unpredictable in each meeting. It becomes our motivation to create fluid syllabus which could be designed to either small or big class. The activity during the project involves active exploration and awareness upon the real problems as we choose public places in the neighborhood to become the major theme for the PBL.

We believe that children should be equipped to something which has never been or less likely taught at formal schools, such as a real problem-solving case to evoke their sense of awareness toward their surrounding. The soft skills in PBL which are intertwined with 21st century skills (ex: Learning & innovation skills, Life & career skills, etc) are something that should be taught positively. A topic on public places is a good example to be shared in PBL class. Children could start from their closest environment to care about their neighborhood and surrounding. Children are expected to explore and observe the public places in their neighborhood a lot closer this time, not just some places they often passing by as they play and walk around the small alley down the neighborhood. This time, children are given time to look closer to find interesting things and even problems. Therefore, children should be able to map the problems and explore the possible solution.

During the project, children are required to write on weekly journal. It is used to track on their own project, consisting of planning and also actual implementation. Although it is one real challenge to help children to write their plans, we do believe that every effort is worth to be driven. The journal and driving questions given by volunteers are techniques to introduce children with literacy context of critical thinking and ability to design their own project. This concept of literacy is integrated within 21st century skills (Trilling & Fadel, 2009) which we try to set objective goals in PBL.

 

Lastly, teacher-centered approach is away from our learning process as teachers (volunteers) act as facilitators to assist children in doing the project. The real problem in the real world is something that we believe need to be exercised from an early age. Thus, in complementing formal education, we try to exercise these soft skills to prepare children for the upcoming challenges.


Written by FIlla Lavenia P.

Everyone Can Participate to Support SDGs

As a follow-up to the past 15-year Millennium Development Goals agenda, in September 2015 the United Nations launched a new, more universal, inclusive and comprehensive resolution called the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). SDGs have 17 new goals to encourage sustainable development based on human rights and equality to encourage social, economic and environmental development. SDG number 6 aims to ensure the availability and sustainable management of clean water and sanitation which one of its targets is to provide access to safe and affordable drinking water that is universally and evenly distributed to everybody in 2030.

Indonesia has committed to support the Sustainable Development Goals by adopting most of the SDGs targets and indicators into the National Medium Term Development Plan (RPJMN) 2020-2024. The integration of the global agenda into the RPJMN shows that the government is paying great attention to legitimizing and providing a legal basis for the implementation of the SDGs agenda in Indonesia.

In July 2017 President Jokowi has signed Presidential Regulation No. 59 of 2017 concerning Implementation of Achievement of Sustainable Development Goals that establish the structure and mechanisms for national SDGs management for planning, budgeting, financing, monitoring and reporting. In this regulation it is stated that one of the national targets of the 2015-2019 RPJMN is to increase access to safe drinking water for 40% of the lowest income population in 2019 to 100%.

The regulation is also a commitment to the implementation and achievement of SDGs carried out in a participatory manner by involving all parties. In accordance with the main principles of SDGs namely inclusion and participation, the importance of the role of non-government actors such as mass organizations, philanthropy, business actors, academics and other related parties is explained there. Various platforms at national and regional levels are needed to bring these non-government actors together and realize a real partnerships.

Non-governmental organizations have an important role in communicating SDGs to the public by making the policy process more transparent and easily accepted. One of the goals of increasing public awareness about SDGs is to empower communities to participate in solving problems around them and contribute to the SDGs.

Besides NGOs, the participation of various parties is a constituent part of sustainable development which is crucial for the realization of the agenda’s objectives by combining various sources of information, knowledge and expertise to generate new ideas, foster commitment for all parties involved, increase awareness of an issue and understand what challenges need to be resolved together.

Project Child Indonesia can be one of the platforms for the meeting of governments, investors, civil society and academics to achieve the goals of the 6th SDGs with the implementation of the Drinking Water Program (DWP). Since its implementation in 2016, DWP has had a positive impact on 29 schools in Yogyakarta, 4 schools in Fakfak, and will continue to be developed in various regions in Indonesia.

This program guarantees the availability of safe and affordable drinking water in schools with funds obtained from investors who care about this issue. Counseling in schools regarding the need for access to drinking water for all communities, the importance of getting enough drinking water for children, and the advantages of the water filter system in terms of health, financial and environmental are also provided by young volunteers who come from various universities in Indonesia and abroad.

The 2030 Agenda emphasizes on “integration” and “unity”, where goals and targets will not be achieved if all parties are working individually. A coherent and holistic approach involving various parties will improve the implementation of SDGs and contribute to the coherence of policies for sustainable development in order to create a civil society.


written by Hidayati Dwi Kusuma Pratiwi

Medical Check Up at Kricak

On 10TH September Project Child Indonesia held an event called General Medical Check-up in one of our River School area, Kricak Kidul. The event was held to help the community and environment to be aware of their health, environment, and to promote our river school too, which held every Monday in the same area. The event was initiated by Dr. Mike Lehmann and his wife, Gabi Lehmann. During their trip to Indonesia, dr.Lehmann and his wife were interested to do voluntary work and community service to help the locals.

The event was successfully held from 09.00 to 16.00 and was divided into two session of medical consultation, morning and afternoon check-up. 32 people from the community were listed and joined the medical check-up, most of them were the elderly with various symptoms such as stroke, muscle pain, and etc. dr. Lehmann and Mrs. Lehmann were helped by three graduate medical students from Gadjah Mada University. They helped the doctor to communicate with the elderly from the community.

After the medical check-up ended, the doctors join our regular class on Monday. The children were very excited to learn about how to wash hands properly, brushing their teeth, and other important behavior. The Lehmanns brought tooth brushes and other equipments to be given to the children, so that children can brush their teeth with the cute toothbrush and made them happy brushing their teeth. The doctors from Indonesia also helped to manage some games in the class and gave children quizzes. The evening was very cheerful and full of spirit.  

We are glad and delighted that there are many people out there who are willing to help our community with their expertise. We hope to see similar event held in other river school community!

Developing Professional Volunteerism in Social Works

 

Defining the term “professional volunteerism” is tricky. The word “professional” could mean someone who gets paid for doing a job, whereas the word “volunteerism” means performing work without getting paid. Thus, the term “professional volunteerism” might sound like an oxymoron. However, the word “professional” also means having an exceptional skill and mastery at something. Referring to the latter definition, “professional volunteerism” could be understood as the act of implementing high level of skills, mastery and work ethics in doing unpaid work.

 

Professional volunteerism usually takes place at nonprofit organizations which mostly rely on volunteers to operate. It is done by preparing volunteers with necessary skills and knowledge to make sure volunteers are ready to contribute positively to the community they work with, instead of doing harm. By developing professional volunteerism, a nonprofit organization could maintain the quality of their programs, as well as developing a strong base of skilled volunteers who hold crucial roles in helping the organization achieve their goals. It enhances the quality of service they give to people or community they work with, and gain better trust from donors and sponsors. Professional volunteerism helps to ensure program sustainability in the long run.

 

Professional volunteerism is developed by well-managing the projects and activities where volunteers are involved. The organization is responsible for fulfilling the volunteers’ need for support during their volunteering time and making sure that volunteers are appreciated for their contribution. The ongoing problem commonly found in volunteer-based social work is disorganized volunteer management. Some organizations depend completely on volunteers’ good intention to show up now and then without any clear commitment. It is good to facilitate the volunteers’ time flexibility, but besides being ineffective for the program, volunteers will feel disengaged and lose interest over time. It motivates them more when volunteers gain a sense of meaning and accomplishment from the program and are recognized by the organization for their significance. It is necessary to make a distinct agreement about commitment, responsibilities, and benefits that occur to both parties during the volunteering process. Training and orientation sessions are essential to make sure volunteers are ready to face the challenges as they dive right into the field. When given the right support and treatment, volunteers will be willing to go the extra miles and help achieve a bigger impact.

 

Professional volunteerism assures you that the time and effort you are pouring is carefully managed to benefit both yourself and other people

 

Professional volunteerism also helps volunteers to grow professionally and benefits the volunteers in many ways. Firstly, it lets you practice your professional skills. When you choose to volunteer specifically in the field of your expertise, it gives you hands-on experience and develops your skills set. You can even acquire new skills and have more freedom to experiment in the relatively low-risk environment. This is especially beneficial for college students and fresh graduates who need opportunities to kick-start their career and increase their future employability. Secondly, you will get a chance to expand your networking. You will get to know people from various backgrounds who share the same views and beliefs as you. You can even meet influential people or community leaders, people who will widen your perspective about the world and those you can earn knowledge from. Thirdly, you will gain an incredibly rewarding experience. Volunteering can be very fulfilling as you do good for other people and help make a difference. It energizes you and makes you feel less absorbed in your daily life stresses. It also helps for professional workers who want a break from their stressful job, as well as improving their skills while at the same time giving back to the community. After all, professional volunteerism assures you that the time and effort you are pouring is carefully managed to benefit both yourself and other people.

 

Project Child Indonesia aims to develop professional volunteerism by applying professional management in volunteer involvement. By giving volunteer the proper training and orientation, we intend to reduce the risk of giving harm to the society we work with. We value our volunteers greatly, and we do our best in maximizing our resources to better support our volunteers. We really hope that volunteers will gain valuable experience when working with us, and flourish both personally and professionally. Developing professional volunteerism is also our take on maintaining a sustainable act of kindness. By professionally managing our programs and volunteers, we believe that we are able to achieve bigger and do greater good for the cause.

 


Written by Margareta Danastri

Sekolah Pantai – First Meeting

On Saturday, July 29th 2017, Project Child Indonesia had successfully conducted the first meeting of Sekolah Pantai in Pacitan, East Java. After two years of preparation and almost a year of construction, the school building had finally been ready to use. The school, located in Pancer beach Pacitan, comprises an open-space classroom, an office building, a kitchen, a sanitary facility, a playing field, a campfire site, and a chill out area, making the school a sufficient and comfortable place for children to learn and explore.

Around 30 students from the neighborhood showed up in the first class, bringing along their curiosity and enthusiasm. The first meeting was intended to get the children to know each other and also the volunteers, therefore we had prepared some introductory and ice-breaking games. The games were delivered in both Indonesian and English and we could start to see how good their English vocabulary is. We had a class full of energetic group activities from 3 PM to 5 PM, and the children were very excited to join all of them. The activities took place in both the classroom and the sports field. The wide school area allowed the children to move around freely, thus they seemed to love the space! Some of the children even stayed longer after class to play some sports with the volunteers.

The volunteers also did a wonderful job delivering the class. There was a total of 15 volunteers and staffs helping out in this first meeting, consisting of local staffs and volunteers from Pacitan, Yogyakarta, and foreign staffs and volunteers from Germany.  By the end of the class, we could already engage well with the previously shy children. We could also see the parents’ interest. Some dropped their children off, encouraging them to join the class, and some stayed in the school area throughout the class session to watch their kids with joy. It seemed like this first meeting was a pleasant experience for everyone involved, signifying a positive start for this program.

We are hoping to see a great future from Sekolah Pantai, that will allow us to reach our goal to impact the communities in Pacitan.

Written by Margareta Danastri

 

 

Internet Literacy Program Kick-off

Project Child Indonesia has completed a wonderful milestone this month. After months of preparation, the new Internet Literacy Program has begun successfully. Internet access in Indonesia has grown astronomically but children remain one of the most vulnerable to understanding the positive and negative aspects of the internet. We strongly believe that equipping children with proper internet literacy education would enormously benefit the workforce of Indonesia.

To reach our goal, we collaborated with three primary schools in Yogyakarta. SD Bumijo 1, SD Bangunrejo 1 and SD Vidya Qasana were chosen to be our pilot schools. We were pleasantly surprised with the reception from the children! Although they are already familiar with the internet, they were curious about what can they can do with the internet. We created a unique syllabus to enhance the usage of the internet as well as educated them on computer hardware. We delivered the knowledge using engaging methodologies and lots of games which created 70 enthusiastic children. By extension, our 14 new volunteers were amazing and taught with enthusiasm and pride. We are so thankful that they joined our mission!

In addition, the schools’ response also humbled us. Our program and methods may be unfamiliar with what they usually do in class, but they were encouraging and were on-board to help us make an impact. “We know that our kids are still unaware with the bad side of the internet. And since we do not have capacity with our limited budget to give them education about it, we really support this program” said Mrs. Puji Lestari M.Pd, the headmaster of SD Bumijo 1. We recognize that commitment from the teachers will ensure that this program will remain sustainable and create a grass-root solution to the educational problem.

Finally, we would like to show our gratitude to our partner, Gameloft, who helped us turn our idea into reality. Gameloft has benevolently donated computers to underprivileged schools, making us able to conduct the internet literacy program. In the next-coming months, we would like to enhance our syllabus to create a new perspective that internet could be child-friendly and that we can use it in a positive and useful way. We are always open to everyone who also desires to help the future generation in any possible way. For further questions, please do not hesitate to contact our program manager at program@projectchild.ngo.

Here’s to making another impact to benefit Indonesian communities!

 

Written by Septian Fajar, Kelly McEtchin