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Raising Awareness on Climate Change Issues Through Education

Written by Sekar Ningtyas Kinasih, Content Writer
Project Child Indonesia


Many scientists have stated if our future generations will face severe issues about climate change, where human beings play the role in rising temperatures around the world. The worse thing is that climate change turns out to be a threat to a child’s opportunity to live, survive and thrive. We often witness that extreme weather such as heat waves rise in frequency and severity, then it threatens children’s lives in several chronic diseases such as renal disease, respiratory disease, fever, and electrolyte imbalance. Floods effects poor water and sanitation facilities, then cause cholera while the children are vulnerable to it. Crop failure caused by the changing of rainfall season and aridity, leading to the rise of food prices that make a lower class economy society would be hard to obtain adequate nutrition that can have lifelong impacts on their health.

Over these cases, we know if climate change has become an urgent issue requiring a global movement, one of which is through education. According to UNESCO, education is a critical tool to help the populations in understanding the impacts of climate change and encourage them to transform behavior to practice more sustainable lifestyles, participate in decision making and take action as soon as possible. They also promote Climate Change Education (ECC) to support the Global Action Programme on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). UNESCO provides guidelines on how to introduce “climate literacy” that becomes government responsibility to involve climate change education towards all levels and components of the education system. It requires strong coordination, support and many resources such as establish curriculum and build teaching methods in schools.

Based on the World Values Survey in 2005-2008 of 47 countries, the people who possess a higher level of education tend to express more concern for the environment. Besides, when in the 2010-2012 World Values Survey asked the participants to choose between protecting the environment versus boosting the economy, the results showed that secondary education preferred the environment more than those with less than secondary education. In separate semi-arid areas of China, farmers who have an adequate educational background are likely to use rainwater harvesting and supplementary irrigation technology to relieve water scarcity. Likewise in the Netherlands and Spain, the more educated people the more they consider to use less energy at home, save much water and control their consumption with environmental harm limitation.

Since it becomes very clear that human actions seriously affect environmental disrepute and climate issues, education should be a limelight to get sharpened and tap their potential. And yet, we do know that it’s really hard to change our attitudes on the preservation of the environment overnight, as well as to complete education courses through formal to informal that going to takes time. But still, the various threats that are not trivial by these issues have assumed an unprecedented pressing to which we are all responsible to do something.

Sources:

  • https://eacea.ec.europa.eu/national-policies/eurydice/content/how-can-education-contribute-awareness-and-action-climate-change_en
  • https://gemreportunesco.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/education-increases-awareness-and-concern-for-the-environment/

How Digital Literacy Can Be Teached on Children

Written by : Mochamad Novritsa Zulfikar

The advancement of technology nowadays surely really influence educational sector. Various things in life that relate with education, like interaction model, literacy model, ability of understanding, and psychological aspect are the things that change since the development of technology. Thus, the change of view or educational method should be done either. Kai-Fu-Lee, on his Tedx seminar about “How AI Can Save Our Humanity”, said that Artificial Intelligence only disrupts on jobs that don’t need creativity and compassion. Both things will make us as the real “human”. Therefore, it is considerable if educational way should be also focused on both. That does not mean we only clear all the courses that already available, but also change the method of lessons and system that can increase their literacy ability.

The main point is, on taking the advantage of the technology advancement, we need a revolution in education that is not to meet the needs of the industry side, but to provide valuable experience to students, educators, or even parents, which is useful in dealing with after-school or real life. The availability of the internet can be both making a good thing or a bad thing for students. We Are Social and Hootsuites, on their report (Digital 2019 Global Overview) on how the internet users around the world (one of them is Indonesia) are growing, reported that the average of people in Indonesia spend their time on internet is 8 hours and 36 minutes a day. Moreover, for only social media activities, they spend for 3 hours 26 minutes a day, with 48% of them is around 13 – 24 years old. Since they already use internet for most of their life activities, we, as an older people than them, should make some actions to control. However, providing regulations or restrictions on children in using the internet is not a wise and effective solution. More fundamentally, giving them an understanding of how to use a good internet is the key. Or, it can be said, invites them to become independent learners based on the internet, in order to improve their literacy skills in seeing every things. That is often referred to as digital literacy.

Utilizing children’s curiosity can turn them into independent learners. Children are natural learners. But, how we can trigger children’s curiosity?

Increasing digital literacy is indeed not an easy thing, especially for children who still often use the internet only as a means of entertainment, not as a means of satisfying their curiosity. In fact, according to Sir Ken Robinson, also on his Tedx seminar about “How to Escape Education’s Death Valley”, He said that the teacher, in the context of education, is a determinant of success in the learning process. Teaching, is a creative profession, not only as a process of passing on information. So, in addition to only digitizing each learning method, students also need to be given an understanding of how to use the internet wisely and optimally. Maybe they, who still think of the internet as merely entertainment, just don’t understand if there is more that they can explore. Therefore, it should be our duty as an educated people to tell and teach them how.

References :

  • How AI can Save Our Humanity | Kai-Fu-Lee https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajGgd9Ld-Wc&t=63s
  • We Are Social and Hootsuites “Digital 2019 Global Overview Reports”
  • How to Escape Education’s Death Valley | Sir Ken Robinson https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX78iKhInsc


Project Child Indonesia Collaborate with Alumni Grant Scheme #1

This article is the first in a tri-series that provides a holistic demonstration of how Project Child Indonesia implemented and conducted a Drinking Water Program in the remote region of Fakfak in Indonesia’s Papua.


Project Child Indonesia (PCI) is an independent, community-based organisation working out of Yogyakarta City in East Java. As an organisation PCI seeks to alleviate poverty in the coastal and riverside communities of Indonesia through the prism of education, and is underpinned by a central vision: for every child in Indonesia to have the opportunity to learn, to have a healthy start, and to feel supported and secure living in a clean environment that is prepared for natural disasters.

A driving force in the pursuit of this vision is PCI’s Drinking Water Program (DWP). The DWP involves installation of water filter infrastructure in schools and the provision of reusable drinking bottles to students, coupled with educational programs to substantiate the filter infrastructure. These educational programs are underpinned by themes of environment and health, and their interconnections, to promote awareness and concern of these issues.

Through functioning, the DWP seeks to intervene and counter the poverty cycle through three lenses: ecological, health, and economic. The filter infrastructure provides children access to clean drinking water, and enables them to use reusable water bottles, leading to a reduction in plastic waste, and hence a direct ecological impact. Improved student health is achieved through the increased access to clean drinking water, coupled with the educational programs that facilitate student understanding of the importance of staying hydrated and avoiding sugary drinks. Finally, through the provision of free drinking water at schools, money spent by parents purchasing water bottles will be severely reduced, opening up limited income to other necessities.

Since 2016 PCI’s DWP has reached approximately 7091 people through it’s implementation in 37 partner schools. However PCI didn’t want to stop there, and wondered whether it’s model of the DWP was bound to Java by geographical context. An idea began to develop and evolve: was the DWP model transferrable to remote areas (where access to clean drinking water is less, and more expensive), and could it function with minimal supervision? Having witnessed the direct benefit derived through the DWP, PCI believed it could.

Enter Fakfak, a town of approximately 13,000 people in the Fakfak Regency of Indonesia’s Papua. Residing in one of Indonesia’s most remote areas, Fakfak is accessible only by boat or plane, with infrequent service and high costs associated to that service. The remoteness and access difficulty has one significant detrimental effect for those living in Fakfak, things are expensive… really expensive, and wages don’t compensate. To put things into perspective a little, while a simple meal of nasi ayam (chicken and rice) in Yogyakarta may cost around 10-12,000 Rupiah, that cost skyrockets to around 40-45,000 Rupiah in Fakfak! That’s a near 400% increase in the cost of a human necessity, food. This is also seen in regard to another basic human necessity, water. Where again in Yogyakarta a student may pay around 500 Rupiah for one water bottle, that same student would have to pay between 1-2000 Rupiah for the same bottle in Fakfak. These bottles are always single-use plastic bottles and represent the cheapest option for people in Fakfak! An even cheaper and more exciting option for students in Fakfak is high sugar content drinks. In Fakfak it is common that the cost of a can of coke will be cheaper than that of a glass of ice tea! When presented with these two options, who wouldn’t choose the can of coke?  Access to clean drinking water in Fakfak is limited, and associated costs high, the environment, people’s health, and economic capacity suffer as a result of this.

Another motivating factor behind PCI’s desire to work collaboratively in Fakfak is the government’s lack of capacity in regard to education and the deliverance of adequate resources for education in Fakfak. It is no indictment on the schools, but the struggle to provide students with an appropriate education that covers themes such as personal health and wellbeing, and the environment, reflect the lack of resources provided to those schools by the government. Environmental awareness is very limited in Fakfak, as it has been something missing from educational curriculums, and without awareness, concern cannot result. It is only through awareness and subsequent concern that personal change in regard to our behaviours toward, and perceptions of, the environment will result. It’s not that people do not care (and the desire from community members in Fakfak to work collaboratively with PCI to implement the program is a testament to the fact that they DO care) it’s that those that maybe seem not to, haven’t been provided with the adequate opportunity to develop that care. However within the lack of resources that characterises much of the education system in Fakfak exists an intense motivation on behalf of local teachers, and the governments understanding of its limited capacity and a subsequent openness to collaboration with organisations.

With the limited access to clean drinking water, the inflated costs associated with that access (those inflated costs characterising all basic needs), a lack of government resources directed towards environmental and health education (and the subsequent environmental and health issues), but an understanding by the government of their lack of capacity and a subsequent a desire an openness from them to work collaboratively to counter these issues, PCI was presented with an opportunity.

With the support from the Australian Government through the Alumni Grant Scheme administered by the Australia Awards in Indonesia, PCI have the opportunity to bring the program to this remote area, and to engage a community that would benefit from the program. PCI eagerly took up the challenge and set about the initial developments and adaptations of its drinking water program to the local context of Fakfak.

Atin Prabandari, the Advisor at Project Child Indonesia receive fund from the Australian Government through the Alumni Grant Scheme and administered by the Australia Awards in Indonesia. The views expressed within this article are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian Embassy Indonesia, Australia Awards in Indonesia and Australia Global Alumni.

Project Child Indonesia Collaborate with Alumni Grant Scheme #3

This article is the third in a tri-series that provides a holistic demonstration of how Project Child Indonesia implemented and conducted a Drinking Water Program in the remote region of Fakfak in Indonesia’s Papua.


As Abie and Filla embarked on their long journey back to Yogyakarta from Fakfak  in Papua, they felt that their, and Project Child Indonesia’s (PCI), collaborative journey with the Fakfak community in West Papua was far from over. On the contrary, as they boarded the plane they understood this to be just the beginning in what they, PCI, and the community of Fakfak hoped to be a long and symbiotic relationship.

The testament to this relationship was immediate, and eagerly welcomed by Abie and Filla, who after only just arriving back in Yogyakarta, were in communication with volunteers, community members, and families from Fakfak. The content of this communication was varied with much of it having little to do with the Drinking Water Program, but more to do with the personal relationships forged between Abie and Filla, and the community of Fakfak. It was a heart-warming time for Abie and Filla as they began to understand the substance of the relationships forged, and saw that the impact of the Drinking Water Program transcended just the physical aims of providing clean water access and educational programs. This acknowledgement and understanding further instilled within Abie and Filla the desire to return to Fakfak when they next got the opportunity to do so.

Beyond the personal communication that Abie and Filla received from the community as the days went by messages, photos and videos began streaming in that demonstrated the impact that the Drinking Water Program had already had within the schools themselves. Photos of the water filters surrounded by smiling students, videos of the use of the filters – the excitement tangible through the screen! Messages coupled with these images from community members, school principals, teachers, and students’ families describing the excitement that followed the installation of the water filters and the subsequent student access to clean drinking water. Abie and Filla had difficulty describing what the content of these messages meant to them, happiness and pride didn’t seem to do it justice. What they did acknowledge however was that the hours upon hours of hard work taken up by them, and a myriad other hard-working dedicated individuals in the lead up to, and throughout the program itself, had been worth it. To see a tangible outcome in the form of student uptake was inspiring to them, and demonstrated not only the benefit, but also the necessity of this program.

With the wake of the program only in the nearby past, program outcome and uptake are only in their very preliminary stages. That being said however, the feedback received by Project Child Indonesia from its friends and collaborators in Fakfak has provided a platform of hope and excitement upon which both Project Child, and Fakfak firmly believe that the project, its teachings, and the associated outcomes can take flight. Access to clean drinking water is a fundamental human right. Project Child Indonesia wishes to see that right materialised for as many young people as they can. Fakfak represents the confirmed capacity of Project Child Indonesia to bring this access, and the associated education, to divergent contexts across the Indonesian archipelago, and is another step in the marathon that Project Child has embarked on; to materialise the basic human right of access to clean drinking water, and to provide the youth of Indonesia with the platform upon which they can become the agents of change that will see the sustainability of our planet pursued.

Atin Prabandari, the Advisor at Project Child Indonesia receive fund from the Australian Government through the Alumni Grant Scheme and administered by the Australia Awards in Indonesia. The views expressed within this article are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian Embassy Indonesia, Australia Awards in Indonesia and Australia Global Alumni.

Project Child Indonesia Collaborate with Alumni Grant Scheme #2

This article is the second in a tri-series that provides a holistic demonstration of how Project Child Indonesia implemented and conducted a Drinking Water Program in the remote region of Fakfak in Indonesia’s Papua.


As you will recall from the previous article in this tri-series, in communication between Project Child Indonesia (PCI) and community members in Indonesia’s remote Fakfak regency, it was determined that a collaboration between the two to implement and conduct a PCI Drinking Water Program in Fakfak was both necessary, and possible, and PCI eagerly took up the challenge. Taking up the challenge was one thing, converting that challenge into practical implementation was another thing entirely.  The following article outlines the steps and processes of program implementation and eventual conductment as told by the two PCI staff that headed this project, Abie and Filla, project manager and education facilitator respectively.

An endeavour such as this isn’t cheap, remembering the inflated costs associated with life in a remote region such as Fakfak, but thankfully, after writing a proposal to the Australian government PCI received a $10,000 AUD grant from the Australian Government through the Alumni Grant Scheme administered by the Australia Awards in Indonesia. There was no turning back now, and in October 2018, the team at PCI began to eagerly engage in workshops on curriculum development for the project in Fakfak. The project was to take place over two weeks in March 2019, giving PCI staff only a few months to adapt the DWP curriculum to fi the time constraints, and the context. Working closely with contacts in Fakfak who would advise on the appropriateness of program components for the students in Fakfak, a curriculum and educative resources were developed that could be utilised and passed on to those in Fakfak in an attempt to promote program longevity after it’s formal conclusion.

The next step beyond initial curriculum development and adaption was to determine which schools would be engaged in the program. After communication with local community members PCI received eight recommendations that community felt would benefit most from the collaborative project. Within the budget it was agreed that these eight recommendations would be the schools that the program would be conducted in. With an adapted curriculum, target schools established in Fakfak, and an intense sense of hope and excitement on behalf of Abie and Filla, PCI embarked on its first external Java program.

On the 16th of March, after a thirteen-hour transit, Abie and Filla arrived in Fakfak for the first time. With little time for rest they got to work straight away. On the first day Abie and Filla met with the Kitong Bisa Learning Centre, a powerful organisation that provides weekly English classes for children in the remote regency of Fakfak. Discussions ensued about the possibility of collaboration and partnership to assist in the conductment and eventual maintenance of the program after the two weeks. Abie and Filla recall the warm reception they received from Kitong Bisa and the excitement and support provided by them that day, and throughout all others along the program journey, each day working closely with them. With an established partner in Kitong Bisa Abie and Filla spent the following day meeting with government to discuss the program, its objectives and implementation plans, and began school visits to inform them that the programs would be starting over the next week.

For the program to be implemented appropriately and sustainably, community engagement was of the upmost importance to PCI. The volunteer training component of the program was fundamental to program success. On the Wednesday night of the first week eighteen volunteers from Kitong Bisa, and another partner, Fakfak Mengajar, composed of all local community members, received program training. Volunteers were introduced to the program, and the water filter infrastructure itself – receiving the necessary skills to maintain and look after the filter infrastructure, and were introduced to the syllabus that they would ultimately be implementing in the schools. Taking place at the house of one of the volunteers, the training resulted in the development of positive relationships and the necessary training to equip the volunteers with the knowledge and skills needed to assist, and then take over and facilitate the program in Fakfak.

The following evening Abie and Filla were invited to a regional planning meeting with other NGOs in Fakfak and all government departments concered. Here they delievered a seven minute presentations on the DWP and subsequently received public endorsements from both government and fellow organisations. The groundwork had been laid, the volunteers equipped, the endorsements received; the program was ready to be brought to the classrooms.

The first class took place on the Friday of the first week with a high level of student and community engagement and an environment of openness and uptake of the program’s content. Students eagerly engaged with the filter infrastructure and the programs educative content and were excited by the new accessibility to clean drinking water! This set the standard for the program classes that took place over the next week and an intense feeling of gratitude overcame Abie and Filla, they were beginning to see the outcome of the hard work of so many people.

Beyond the classroom, Abie and Filla continued working tirelessly to ensure the schools, community members, and government officials were all equipped with the adequate knowledge and skills to maintain the drinking water infrastructure, and could work collaboratively to ensure its future. On the Tuesday of the second week an event was held with the department of health and education, and the partner schools to give training about the filter infrastructure and introduce the schools themselves to elements of the curriculum that could be maintained after PCI had left Fakfak, namely in regard to environmental awareness and personal health and wellbeing. Abie and Filla provided schools with the resources to maintain the deliverance of these curriculum elements.

Abie received a lot of support from community members in the installation process of the water filters, educating around their maintenance and empowering members to understand the necessity and benefit of the filter infrastructure.

While the in-school classes engaged the student side of things, Abie and Filla engaged extensively with local community members to share the program with them. While Filla engaged in some classes with Kitong Bisa – much to the excitement of students and community, Abie received a lot of support from community members in the installation process of the water filters, educating around their maintenance and empowering members to understand the necessity and benefit of the filter infrastructure. Abie and Filla did not take for granted the warm welcome and willingness engage with the program that they had received in Fakfak.

After two weeks Abie and Filla, in collaboration with Fakfak community members, had installed eight water filters in eight schools, trained eighteen (check this number) volunteers and equipped them with the skills to maintain filter infrastructure and program delivery, been endorsed by local government and concerned parties, and conducted program classes in seven of the eight schools (one school had exams on the day of the proposed educative program and could not participate, but the filter was installed and the volunteers conducted the class after Abie and Filla had left). It was with a heavy heart that Abie and Filla left after what was a powerful two weeks of shared learning and community engagement, and the relationships developed, education promoted, and ultimately the program conducted, filled them with hope and excitement for the future of the Fakfak program.

Atin Prabandari, the Advisor at Project Child Indonesia receive fund from the Australian Government through the Alumni Grant Scheme and administered by the Australia Awards in Indonesia. The views expressed within this article are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian Embassy Indonesia, Australia Awards in Indonesia and Australia Global Alumni.

Project Child Indonesia Collaborate with Alumni Grant Scheme #1

This article is the first in a tri-series that provides a holistic demonstration of how Project Child Indonesia implemented and conducted a Drinking Water Program in the remote region of Fakfak in Indonesia’s Papua.


Project Child Indonesia (PCI) is an independent, community-based organisation working out of Yogyakarta City in East Java. As an organisation PCI seeks to alleviate poverty in the coastal and riverside communities of Indonesia through the prism of education, and is underpinned by a central vision: for every child in Indonesia to have the opportunity to learn, to have a healthy start, and to feel supported and secure living in a clean environment that is prepared for natural disasters.

A driving force in the pursuit of this vision is PCI’s Drinking Water Program (DWP). The DWP involves installation of water filter infrastructure in schools and the provision of reusable drinking bottles to students, coupled with educational programs to substantiate the filter infrastructure. These educational programs are underpinned by themes of environment and health, and their interconnections, to promote awareness and concern of these issues.

Through functioning, the DWP seeks to intervene and counter the poverty cycle through three lenses: ecological, health, and economic. The filter infrastructure provides children access to clean drinking water, and enables them to use reusable water bottles, leading to a reduction in plastic waste, and hence a direct ecological impact. Improved student health is achieved through the increased access to clean drinking water, coupled with the educational programs that facilitate student understanding of the importance of staying hydrated and avoiding sugary drinks. Finally, through the provision of free drinking water at schools, money spent by parents purchasing water bottles will be severely reduced, opening up limited income to other necessities.

Since 2016 PCI’s DWP has reached approximately 7091 people through it’s implementation in 37 partner schools. However PCI didn’t want to stop there, and wondered whether it’s model of the DWP was bound to Java by geographical context. An idea began to develop and evolve: was the DWP model transferrable to remote areas (where access to clean drinking water is less, and more expensive), and could it function with minimal supervision? Having witnessed the direct benefit derived through the DWP, PCI believed it could.

Enter Fakfak, a town of approximately 13,000 people in the Fakfak Regency of Indonesia’s Papua. Residing in one of Indonesia’s most remote areas, Fakfak is accessible only by boat or plane, with infrequent service and high costs associated to that service. The remoteness and access difficulty has one significant detrimental effect for those living in Fakfak, things are expensive… really expensive, and wages don’t compensate. To put things into perspective a little, while a simple meal of nasi ayam (chicken and rice) in Yogyakarta may cost around 10-12,000 Rupiah, that cost skyrockets to around 40-45,000 Rupiah in Fakfak! That’s a near 400% increase in the cost of a human necessity, food. This is also seen in regard to another basic human necessity, water. Where again in Yogyakarta a student may pay around 500 Rupiah for one water bottle, that same student would have to pay between 1-2000 Rupiah for the same bottle in Fakfak. These bottles are always single-use plastic bottles and represent the cheapest option for people in Fakfak! An even cheaper and more exciting option for students in Fakfak is high sugar content drinks. In Fakfak it is common that the cost of a can of coke will be cheaper than that of a glass of ice tea! When presented with these two options, who wouldn’t choose the can of coke?  Access to clean drinking water in Fakfak is limited, and associated costs high, the environment, people’s health, and economic capacity suffer as a result of this.

Another motivating factor behind PCI’s desire to work collaboratively in Fakfak is the government’s lack of capacity in regard to education and the deliverance of adequate resources for education in Fakfak. It is no indictment on the schools, but the struggle to provide students with an appropriate education that covers themes such as personal health and wellbeing, and the environment, reflect the lack of resources provided to those schools by the government. Environmental awareness is very limited in Fakfak, as it has been something missing from educational curriculums, and without awareness, concern cannot result. It is only through awareness and subsequent concern that personal change in regard to our behaviours toward, and perceptions of, the environment will result. It’s not that people do not care (and the desire from community members in Fakfak to work collaboratively with PCI to implement the program is a testament to the fact that they DO care) it’s that those that maybe seem not to, haven’t been provided with the adequate opportunity to develop that care. However within the lack of resources that characterises much of the education system in Fakfak exists an intense motivation on behalf of local teachers, and the governments understanding of its limited capacity and a subsequent openness to collaboration with organisations.

With the limited access to clean drinking water, the inflated costs associated with that access (those inflated costs characterising all basic needs), a lack of government resources directed towards environmental and health education (and the subsequent environmental and health issues), but an understanding by the government of their lack of capacity and a subsequent a desire an openness from them to work collaboratively to counter these issues, PCI was presented with an opportunity.

With the support from the Australian Government through the Alumni Grant Scheme administered by the Australia Awards in Indonesia, PCI have the opportunity to bring the program to this remote area, and to engage a community that would benefit from the program. PCI eagerly took up the challenge and set about the initial developments and adaptations of its drinking water program to the local context of Fakfak.

Atin Prabandari, the Advisor at Project Child Indonesia receive fund from the Australian Government through the Alumni Grant Scheme and administered by the Australia Awards in Indonesia. The views expressed within this article are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian Embassy Indonesia, Australia Awards in Indonesia and Australia Global Alumni.

Children Drink Sweet Drinks When They Lack Clean Drinking Water

Written by: Atin Prabandari and Muhammad Abie Zaidannas Suhud


Children deserve to get clean and safe drinking water. But, in developing countries such as Indonesia, not all children have access to it. A new survey has found this can drive them to consume sweet beverages, posing a risk to their health. Child rights organization Project Child Indonesia surveyed 272 respondents in ten elementary schools in Yogyakarta and Fakfak, West Papua. The survey showed that a third of the respondents turned to sweet beverages as they lacked access to clean and safe drinking water.

Sweet Lure

Consuming sweetened beverages can increase the risks of obesity, insulin resistance, and dental caries. Children often turn to sweetened beverages as they are more attractive and taste sweeter than plain water. Massive advertising of sweetened drinks also attracts children to consume them. In this regard, a lack of access to clean and safe drinking water may exacerbate these habits. Our respondents said they preferred sweet drinks as they believed the cost of packaged mineral water was as expensive or more expensive than sugary beverages. Bottled mineral water costs twice as much in Fakfak as a bottle of mineral water in Surabaya, East Jawa.

Solution: Install Water Filters in Schools

Project Child Indonesia carried out the survey with independent researchers in Yogyakarta and Fakfak in 2019 as a basis to provide clean and safe drinking water in the latter city. A report from Project Child Indonesia indicates that only a few of more than 270,000 elementary schools in Indonesia provided free, clean and safe drinking water for their students. The condition is believed to be much worse in Papua, the most eastern part and least developed region of Indonesia. The 2015 Indonesian National Socioeconomic Survey showed the Papuan region still lacked access to drinking water, despite improvements in Java and Bali islands. Schools in Papua also do not offer adequate environmental and health education. As a result, children lack awareness of the importance of safe and clean drinking water.

Based on our findings, we created a project to address the water access problem faced by children in West Papua. We installed drinking water filters in eight schools in Fakfak, West Papua. Water filters are important in Papua as the price of mineral water is high there. Water filters can help Papuans get cheaper drinking water as they only need to process water supply from rainwater or local drinking water companies. Before consuming water from these sources, we need to treat it to remove chemical contaminants.

We also designed a campaign to introduce the habit to consume safe and clean drinking water. We established drinking water committees involving parents, teachers, and representatives from local communities. This committee has worked together with local communities Fakfak Mengajar and Kitong Bisa to ensure the program’s safety and sustainability.

For this project, we work closely with the government’s local health and education agencies. This shows a collaborative effort between various stakeholders in society is required to ensure children have access to clean and safe drinking water.


This article was originally published on The Conversation.

The Importance of Partnership and Collaboration in Non-profit Sector

Written by Sekar Ningtyas Kinasih, Content Writer
Project Child Indonesia


We believe that collaboration is not about an option to choose, but a necessity to strengthen the efficiencies and effectiveness to tackle down of what we need to settle and generate a better impact for a better world.

When we are talking about how the non-profit organization stirring their mission forward, how to keep it steady while achieving goals or how to prevent any crisis mode on the financial system, well, the power in collaboration or partnership is at an all-time way best to take larger steps in ameliorating the community and create a better world. Even though the organizations have particular reasons to work collaboratively, Forbes finds that there are similar aims that the organizations are looking for such as: saving costs, strengthen programs, organizational efficiency and effectiveness, improve services and leadership skills.

Saving Costs

The greatest benefit in doing collaborations with other fellows of nonprofit organizations is saving so many costs, particularly in administrative matters. Both organizations can lighten each other up to maintain their expenses for training, workshop facility, office supplies, transportation or anything that relates to their missions.

Strengthen Programs

Collaboration also helps expand organizational programs through building new ones or combining the existing programs and making them stronger. It is possible to lead to a wider set of resources and support tools that will make programs more reachable at lower costs. Both organizations can expand their capacity to be developed and provide more value from each program that has been run. Besides, another major benefit from the collaboration is also enhancing the awareness of the organization’s brand. This can be counted as a strategy in promoting each organization to reach broader networks or partners. Whether it features through social media, website or any traditional marketing efforts which inherently doubles the branding strategy. 

In this case, Project Child Indonesia has involved with many parties to support the establishment movement of their program. For instance in November 2018, PCI together  with Semua Murid Semua Guru (SMSG) had discussed about the importance of educational movement in Indonesia to encourage the idea of volunteerism to people in getting used to reading news and collaborate more often to encourage the same movement since we trust on how collaboration among independent organizations would have more impact rather than working on our own.

Organizational Efficiency and Effectiveness

Efficiency and effectiveness would be another highlight benefit that the organization would have by implementing the collaboration. The efficiency means that the organization is more capable to accomplish the missions more quickly and the effectiveness means the organization is capable to reach the goals more successfully.

Improving Services

In collaborating, the organization would gain a new opportunity to improve its service provided and generate access to new different kinds of tools or resources. For instance, there is a collaboration between 2 organizations that one of them is focusing to serve the homeless community, while the other one (the partner) is who provides job training. These combinations can fulfill each other’s that one could refer the companies to get more job trainer or resources, and the other could refer their clients who need the shelter for more services.

Leadership Skills

The major concern of building up the collaboration is to rise up the capacity in exploring the new leadership skills. When executives or board members from different non-profit organizations gather their capability, knowledge and any other expertise skills cooperatively, then there would be more steps to absorbed in furthering the missions. Additionally, the partnership would encourage new leaders to join and move together in the organization in a better direction.

Every single of non-profit organizations across the country, they have been working for not-just-to maximize of what are they aiming to in the first place, but also to inspire and provoke other people on a larger scale. But large scale progress would not happen straight away. It requires the combination of more and more collaborators among different organizations, pooling resources and battling together. It also requires a concrete establishment through create innovation of programs and reinforce one another. Regarding this, Project Child Indonesia is incredibly fortunate to get many opportunities in collaborating with various partnerships in the form of doing workshops, research, hosting and big event collaboration to funding.

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Gut aufgestellt für das Zeitalter der Disruption

Written by: Ega Kusuma Ahimsa- Teaching-Learning Assessor Intern



What I try to focus on is not to try to stop the march of technological progress. Instead, I try to run faster. If Amazon knows you better than you know yourself, then the game is up.

Yuval Noah Harari

Ob Wissenschaft, Forschung oder Technologie – unser heutiger Stand geht inzwischen weit über das hinaus, was vor Jahrzehnten noch nicht einmal in Ansätzen vorstellbar war. Dieser rasante Fortschritt verändert unsere Welt nachhaltig und läutet eine neue Ära: Das Zeitalter der Disruption. Neue Technologien, wie Roboter, künstliche Intelligenz und Gentechnik in der Biotechnologie nehmen Einfluss auf nahezu alle Bereiche und Aspekte unseres Lebens. Eines der besten Beispiele dieser tiefgreifenden Veränderungsprozesse ist das Internet, das Menschen heute weltweit vernetzt und unbegrenzten Austausch von Wissen, unterschiedlichen Lebens- und Arbeitsweisen sowie Kulturen ermöglicht. Das britische Magazine The Economist beschreibt mit ihrem Begriff “techlash” die Zeit, in der die Technologie die Oberhand über unser Leben übernimmt und daraus resultierende ökonomische, aber auch soziale, politische und kulturelle Folgen.

Neben vielen Vorteilen birgt das neue Zeitalter jedoch auch negative Auswirkungen. Es steht außer Frage, dass Technologie dazu gedacht ist, den Menschen zu unterstützen. Dennoch sorgt sie durch ihren Eingriff in unser gewohntes, gesellschaftliches Leben für tiefgreifende Veränderungen und Umbrüche, sogenannte Disruptionen. Auch Indonesien sieht sich aktuell mit diesen konfrontiert und ist in vielen Bereichen noch nicht ausreichend gut aufgestellt, um diese zu bewältigen, wie Ergebnisse des vom Weltwirtschaftsforum (WEF) veröffentlichen Global Competitiveness Reports zeigen.  Das WEF erhebt mit dem Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) eine Kennzahl, die die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit einzelner Nationen bewertet. Dazu werden die drei Bereiche “Grundvoraussetzungen”, darunter Infrastruktur, Gesundheitswesen und Bildung, “Effizienzsteigernde Faktoren”, wie der technologischer Reifegrad und die Hochschulbildung sowie “Innovationsfaktoren” betrachtet. In der Auswertung aus den Jahren 2017/ 2018 belegt Indonesien unter 137 Ländern den 36. Platz. Im Vergleich zur vorhergehenden Auswertung konnte sich Indonesien um 5 Plätze verbessern, liegt aber dennoch hinter seinen Nachbarländern Thailand (32. Platz), Malaysia (23. Platz) und Singapur (3. Platz). Die Hauptursachen für das schlechte Abschneiden im nationalen Vergleich sind auf Schwächen im Gesundheits- und Grundschulwesen zurückzuführen, Grundvoraussetzungen gesellschaftlichen Wohlergehens. Vor allem im Bereich Lebenserwartung (Platz 101) und in Hinblick auf die Einschulungsraten (Platz 106) belegt Indonesien hintere Ränge. Auch die Qualität der Grundschulbildung wird mit Platz 47 schwach bewertet.

Ergänzend zum GCI veröffentlichte das WEF 2018 den Report “Future of Job”, in welchem zukünftig benötigte Fertig- und Fähigkeiten identifiziert wurden: komplexes Problemlösen, kritisches Denken, Kreativität, Personalführung, Gruppenarbeit, emotionale Intelligenz, Service-orientiertes Denken, Verhandlungsfähigkeit, kognitive Flexibilität, Urteilsvermögen und Entscheidungsfindung. Diese sollten frühzeitig in das Bildungssystem integriert werden, was jedoch in Indonesien derzeit nur in Teilen umgesetzt werden kann.  

Als Reaktion auf die Herausforderungen und gewachsenen Anforderungen im Bildungsbereich hat Project Child Indonesia (PCI) als Non-Government Organisation 2011 das Programm “Sekolah Sungai” (Schule am Fluss) initiiert. PCI nimmt sich dabei den Schwächen des aktuellen indonesischen Bildungsprogramms an. Idee hinter dem Konzept ist es, die Bildungsinfrastruktur sowie die Qualität der Lehre zu verbessern und den Lehrplan zu aktualisieren. Die bestehende, formelle Bildung soll ausgebaut und auf heutige Anforderungen ausgerichtet werden. In der “Sekolah Sungai” bietet PCI Kindern aus den in Flussnähe lebenden Gemeinden Kricak, Gadjah Wong und Code in Yogyakarta die Möglichkeit, wöchentliche am Unterricht teilzunehmen. Dabei setzt PCI die Methode des projektbasierten Lernens (PBL) ein, das an die lokalen Voraussetzungen der Gemeinden am Fluss angepasst wurde. Die Methodik soll Schüler auf die Herausforderungen des 21. Jahrhundert vorbereiten, indem am Beispiel realer Probleme durch analytische und praktische Fähigkeiten Lösungen erarbeitet werden. In der Regel ist ein konkretes Produkt oder eine Präsentation das Ergebnis des Projekts, an dem die Kinder unter Anleitung in einem zuvor definierten Zeitrahmen arbeiten. Darüber hinaus stärkt PBL den angebotenen Gemeinschaftsunterricht, indem alternative Bildung in Form  kritischen Denkens, Kreativität und Kommunikationsfähigkeiten ergänzend zum bestehenden Lehrplan vermittelt wird.

Die Sekolah Sungai in Gadjah Wong, kurz “SS Gadjah Wong”, gehört zu einer dieser Schulen am Fluss. Der Zugang zu Bildung über formelle Wege ist hier immer noch stark eingeschränkt, so auch die Lesefähigkeit und das Interesse an Literatur. Hinzu kommen schlechte sozial-ökonomische Bedingungen, was es den Menschen dort erschwert, grundlegende Fähigkeiten wie kritisches Denken, Kreativität und kognitive Flexibilität als Antwort auf die gestiegenen Anforderungen des 21. Jahrhunderts zu entwickeln.

Im Rahmen des insgesamt 10 wöchigen Programms wurden hintereinander die beiden Projekte “Public Places in Your Neighborhood”  sowie “Literacy Project” mit Schülern im Alter zwischen 6 und 14 Jahren umgesetzt. Unterstützt wurden die Kinder dabei von Sekolah Sungai Volontären. Der PBL-Ansatz zeigte bei beiden Projekten positive Auswirkungen auf die Entwicklung der Schüler. Diese wurden mutiger darin, sich selbst auszudrücken, kreativer und besser in der Zusammenarbeit mit anderen.

Im ersten Teil des Programms wurde die Aufmerksamkeit der Kinder auf die eigene Nachbarschaft und dort bestehenden Probleme gelenkt. Gemeinsam mit den Volontären machten die Schüler Beobachtungen an öffentlichen Plätzen, um Informationen über bestehende Probleme zu sammeln. Darauf basierend wurden mögliche Lösungen gemeinschaftlich entwickelt und diskutiert. Auch das “Literacy Project” wurde mit PBL umgesetzt. Ziel war es, das Interesse der Kinder in Bücher, Magazine und Comics zu stärken. Darüber hinaus wurde die eigene Kreativität geschult, indem gemeinsam mit Volontären eine Handlungsrahmen für eine eigene Geschichte entwickelt wurde, auf Basis dessen anschließend Kurzgeschichten, Comics und Bildergeschichten entstanden.

Beide Projekte haben gezeigt, dass PBL einen Ansatz darstellen kann, bestehende Lehrpläne auf die Anforderungen des Zeitalters der Disruption auszurichten und so das indonesische Bildungssystem langfristig und nachhaltig zu verbessern.


Bibliography

https://www.economist.com/news/2013/11/18/the-coming-tech-lash

https://www.quora.com/What-does-the-techlash-mean

https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-future-of-jobs-report-2018

https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-competitiveness-report-2017-2018

Kesukarelawanan Anak Muda untuk Meraih Tujuan-Tujuan Pembangunan Berkelanjutan (SDGs)

Kita tidak bisa selalu membangun masa depan untuk para pemuda kita, tapi kita bisa membangun para pemuda kita untuk masa depan

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Menurut Perserikatan Bangsa-Bangsa (PBB), ada 1.8 miliar orang yang berumur 10-24 tahun di dunia, yang bisa dikatakan sebagai generasi terbesar anak muda dalam sejarah. Oleh karena itu, peran anak-anak muda dalam mengadvokasi dan mengeksekusi perubahan sangat krusial, terutama dengan melihat peran mereka sebagai agen perubahan untuk masa depan. Dalam menanggapi fenomena ini, PBB telah menekankan dan mendorong partisipasi aktif para pemuda untuk berkontribusi dalam mempercepat meraih Tujuan-Tujuan Pembangunan Berkelanjutan (SDGs). Di banyak negara, terutama negara-negara yang sedang berkembang dan kurang berkembang, banyak pemuda yang mengalami beberapa masalah besar terkait dengan SDGs, seperti kurangnya akses pada pendidikan, layanan kesehatan, dan pekerjaan, yang pada akhirnya akan membuat lebih banyak masalah sosio-ekonomi struktural di masa yang akan datang. Tentu saja, salah satu cara yang relatif terbaik dan termudah untuk mendorong keterlibatan mereka dalam menyelesaikan masalah-masalah tersebut, adalah melalui aktivitas-aktivitas kesukarelawanan.

Kesukarelawanan, yang biasanya dieksekusi melalui lembaga-lembaga non-profit, telah secara signifikan memberi berbagai dampak positif terhadap pemangku-pemangku kepentingan yang terlibat, seperti organisasi-organisasi non-profit itu sendiri, serta para pemuda dan komunitas-komunitas yang terlibat. Lembaga-lembaga non-profit dapat diuntungkan melalui meluasnya misi-misinya, meningkatnya dukungan publik, dan munculnya para pendukung dan relawan baru. Sementara itu, para anak muda dapat diuntungkan dalam hal peningkatan pengembangan diri mereka, yang mencakup rasa tanggung jawab, empati, kepercayaan diri, kemampuan-kemampuan sosial yang baru, meningkatnya kesehatan fisik dan mental, dan perkembangan-perkembangan psikologis dan intelektual yang lainnya. PBB sendiri sudah mengakui grup-grup relawan sebagai salah satu pemangku kepentingan untuk mencapai “Agenda 2030 untuk Pembangunan Berkelanjutan”, yang juga sangat bisa membantu perkembangan perencanaan nasional dan implementasinya.

Dapat dilihat bahwa kesukarelawanan adalah salah satu alat pemacu berjalannya pembangunan berkelanjutan, dan sangat direkomendasikan bagi semua komunitas untuk ikut terlibat. Meskipun demikian, terlepas dari manfaat-manfaat dari kesukarelawanan anak muda yang sudah disebutkan sebelumnya, banyak anak muda yang sayangnya masih belum memiliki dorongan yang cukup untuk melakukan aktivitas-aktivitas kerelawanan, yang dapat disebabkan oleh kurangnya informasi, waktu, ketertarikan, dan sebagainya. Terlepas dari masalah-masalah tersebut yang harus diperhitungkan, kesukarelawanan tentunya akan memberi banyak keuntungan untuk para pemuda dan komunitas-komunitas grassroot yang terlibat, terutama dalam usaha meraih SDGs. Terlepas dari pentingnya dan efektifnya kesukarelawanan, aktivitas ini tidak dimasukkan dalam agenda Tujuan-Tujuan Pembangunan Milenial (MDGs) waktu itu. Pentingnya dan efektifnya kesukarelawanan juga dapat dibuktikan dengan fakta bahwa negara-negara yang memiliki jumlah relawan yang banyak cenderung lebih giat dalam memelihara kondisi sosial dan ekonominya, menurut sebuah statistik dari The International Forum for Volunteering in Development. Banyak aspek dari kemiskinan yang juga dapat secara perlahan diselesaikan melalui aktivitas kesukarelawanan, seperti aspek pendidikan, kesehatan, pekerjaan, dan lingkungan tempat tinggal, yang mana merupakan objektif-objektif utama dari implementasi SDGs.

Jangan tunggu lagi, mari menjadi seorang relawan untuk meraih SDGs bersama-sama!