Commemorating the First-ever International Day of Education: Indonesia and the World to Take Bigger Steps to Achieve Educational Equality

Education is a human right, a public good and a public responsibility.”
Chief of UNESCO at the Inauguration of the International Day of Education


Education has played a crucial role in the efforts of achieving all of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); therefore, its importance could not unquestionably be overlooked. The establishment of the International Day of Education by the United Nations indicates further awareness and commitments of the international community to embody the 4th SDGs, which is quality education. The UN chief emphasized during the inaugural day, that the world could not afford a youth generation who have inadequate necessary skills to compete in the 21st century economy. He stated so as there are still at least 262 million children, adolescents, and youth who are out of school, in which most of them are girls; millions who attend the school are not mastering the basics.  It could be seen that unequal access to education has become a major obstacle for most countries in achieving inclusive growth, and therefore, should be taken into account by all layers of the society.

Each country has different levels of educational disparities within it, regardless of whether it is a developed or developing, a poor or rich nation. The United Kingdom, despite its position as the world’s 5th largest economy, is ranked 23th in the world in primary school inequalities, according to UNICEF’s report, An Unfair Start. The driving factors of the inequalities might be due to unequal income distribution, as well as low quality education.This also happens in Australia, where educational inequality has largely taken place, with the discrepancy of socioeconomic status and parents’ education as the main influencing factors, which also have contributed to the widening gap between rich and poor. Aside from those aforementioned factors, the conduct of discriminatory practices might also be the cause, either based on race, religion, gender, and so forth.

Indonesia is no different compared to the aforementioned countries; it is also experiencing high educational disparities. While a child in Jakarta could pursue 11 years of schooling, a child in Papua could only be expected to complete 6 years of education in schools. It could be seen that the access to education in rural areas is still highly limited. To add further, the significant discrepancy of income in Indonesia has made the problem becomes worse; high-quality education remains inaccessible for those who come from poor families. Only those who come from financially-capable families who would be able to choose between private or public schools. Students with disabilities also experience educational inequality and inaccessibility, as according to the research carried out by the University of Indonesia, almost 70% of disabled children do not go to school, and 66.8% of them even only have the chance to pursue their education until the primary school level.  Those cases indicate how inclusive education still remains a challenge that Indonesian government and society should strive for it harder to make it into the reality.

Currently, education has increasingly mattered more than ever, as people could pursue better opportunities and live better lives if they are sufficiently educated. Nonetheless, the increasing educational inequalities in the world has made achieving inclusive and quality education becomes a challenge that should be resolved by the international community. Universal access to education should be guaranteed through collaborations among government, civil society, non-governmental organizations, and other relevant stakeholders in order to make sure that the “No One Left Behind” tagline is not merely a talk, but also an act.

written by Felice Valeria – Content Writer Project Child Indonesia

Focus Group Discussion about Community-based Tourism

Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta is rich with culture and full of tourism potential. In particular, Kampung Wisata Cokrodiningratan. On Saturday, February 9th 2019 Project Child Indonesia with the community of Kampung Jetisharjo RW 06, held a Focus Group Discussion about community based tourism. Around 17 people came and took part actively in the discussion. The discussion was facilitated by Surayah Ryha, the Executive Director of Project Child Indonesia.

The Focus Group Discussion started at 20.00 WIB. For the first session, PCI and the community discussed about the definition of “Wisata Kampung”. On the second session, they discussed about the potential that their village have. The Focus Group Discussion managed to map out several tourism potential as well. There’s a potential in nature, since Kampung Jetisharjo RW 06 located on the river bank of Sungai Code. They also have potential in culture and food, such as Jathilan, and Pasar Kuliner (Food Festival). The session continued as the community tried to map out the weaknesses that their village have. Some of the participant expressed their concern towards keeping commitment and spirit in pursuing a community based tourism. Others share concerned in English language ability. The last session, the community talked about opportunities and challenges that they may have to face for community based tourism.

This Focus Group Discussion was meant to introduce the concept of community based tourism and participatory tourism to the community. By implementing community based tourism, the community learns to take active part in managing tourism in their own village. Furthermore, by implementing participatory tourism, it means that the tourist that came to Kampung Jetisharjo will take part actively in the villagers live. The tourist that come to Kampung Jetisharjo won’t be only doing sightseeing, but they will engage with the locals and participate in various activities with them as well.

The next step after this Focus Group Discussion is establishing a community based tourism organization, or in Bahasa it’s called Kelompok Sadar Pariwisata (Pokdarwis). Pokdarwis will be the platform for the community to explore and start their community based tourism. It is also expected that by establishing Pokdarwis, the community could gain trainings, fundings, etc from the government.

WASH: Back to Basics

written by Alice Pidgeon

Safe water, sanitation and hygiene at home should not be a privilege… These are some of the most basic requirements for human health, and all countries have a responsibility to ensure that everyone can access them.

– Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO)

The basic principles of WASH, along with busy lifestyles can mean that people become immune to remembering the importance of what, when and why of WASH. Humans need water to survive, hygiene to be healthy, and sanitation to live in safe environments. WASH is the acronym for Water And Sanitation Hygiene created by UNICEF. It’s the catchy reminder that clean hands, hygienic habits and uncontaminated environments are key to maintaining a healthy life and wellbeing. The message of WASH is sharp and clear; clean water for consumption, the presence of sanitation facilities, and the availability of soap and water for handwashing are all needed. While it may sound like a simple message, it can often be forgotten or difficult to achieve as the facilities needed aren’t available. Despite Indonesia having positive economic growth in recent years, it is not uncommon for citizens to still suffer from poor access to safe water and sanitation.

New evidence from the World Bank’s report on WASH in Indonesia shows that owning a toilet, drinking clean water, and living in a community where most of one’s neighbours own a toilet are important drivers of child growth and cognitive development in Indonesia. Unequal access to these services can stunt a child’s growth with impairment to their development, learning and earning. UNICEF reports that stunting odds are 1.4X greater for children in Indonesia without improved sanitation. This causes intergenerational factors that can lead to greater future problems. To level the playing field, children need to be educated on the importance of WASH to lead healthier lives and enhance their wellbeing.

Project Child works with three communities in Yogyakarta in their Sekolah Sungai (river school) program to empower the children to be the agents of change using project based learning. They become positive influences in their communities, working together towards alleviating the incidences and burdens from poor water, sanitation and hygiene they may experience through finding solutions and making improvements. The lessons of WASH translate into life based skills that can help to the children to become healthy citizens physically, mentally and socially. Project Child educates the children based on the three components of WASH including water, sanitation and hygiene;

Water

Water is needed to survive, but if it isn’t safe to drink and use it isn’t helping to survive. Water can be become the problem when it is ‘dirty water’, referring to it being contaminated, unsafe, or if there is an inadequate supply. Contamination can occur at the source (such as rivers or wells), during transportation (being carried in a dirty bucket), or at the time of consumption (dirty hands touching the water). To make water safe, treatment and storage methods can be tailored to meet local needs allowing people access to clean water.

Sanitation

Sanitation refers to safely collecting, treating and disposing of human waste. This includes basic sanitation facilities such as toilets, latrines and stopping open defecation in spaces such as waterways and streets. A lack of sanitation can cause serious health risks from faecal waste making its way into the environment as very serious health risks including diarrhoea, cholera and dysentery can be transmitted. Sanitation also addresses safety issues and undermines feelings of self-dignity, particularly for women and children. When nature calls, a safe place is needed to answer. Proper sanitation that is separated from other people coming into contact with the waste. Infections are prevented and lives are saved.

Hygiene

Hygiene is primarily about health and the actions that are taken to ensure cleanliness of people, homes, schools, communities and other people. One of the most simple and effective means for hygiene is handwashing with soap to prevent the transmission of bacteria and viruses. Just because germs cannot be seen, it doesn’t mean they don’t exist. With contaminated hands being one of the main ways diarrhoea is spread, it’s critical to educate children and caregivers on the importance of hand washing.


While the three components of WASH can be looked at separately, the success of them cannot be reached without understanding how they all connect. Essentially one cannot be realised without the others; and without the others, heavy burdens can be placed on individuals and communities, particularly children. For example, despite clean water being used to prepare food, if the person preparing the food hasn’t washed their hands the food can become contaminated with bacteria making the people eating it sick. Or, open defecation leaves excreta where children are playing, and then children bring it into the households. The connection between the three components of WASH also exemplifies the connection for how meaningful progress on the Sustainable Development Goal 6 (clean water and sanitation) cannot be achieved without an inter-sectoral approach to Goal 3 (good health and wellbeing) and Goal 13 (climate action). Poor WASH heightens health risks that will be further exacerbated by climate change as natural disasters become more prevalent increasing the risk of food and water borne diseases. These are further reinforced by achieving the other SDGs including education, energy, nutrition and ending poverty.

Health is a prerequisite for everything to flourish; an opportunity every child deserves. Poor water, sanitation and hygiene should not be the barrier that prevents Indonesian children, and children around the world from developing, learning and earning. WASH underpins poverty reduction, economic growth and healthy ecosystems by contributing to social wellbeing, inclusive growth and sustainable livelihoods. Project Child works collectively in their sekolah sungai program, recognising and educating that WASH is a prerequisite for the children and their communities to flourish healthily and maintain their wellbeing.

References:

https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/28505/W17018.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

https://www.unicef.org/indonesia/wes.html

Youth Volunteerism to Achieve Sustainable Development Goals

By: Felice Valeria, Content Writer Intern Project Child Indonesia

We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future.

– Franklin D. Roosevelt

According to the United Nations, there are 1.8 billion people aged between 10-24 in the world, which could be said as the largest generation of youth in history. Hence, the role of youth in advocating for and executing changes seems to be really crucial, especially by taking into account their role as agents of change for the future. In responding to this particular phenomenon, the United Nations has highly distressed and encouraged the active participation of young people to contribute in advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In many countries, particularly the developing and underdeveloped ones, most of the youths are facing several major challenges in terms of SDGs, such as but not limited to the lack of access to education, healthcare, and employment, which eventually would create more structural socio-economic problems in the future. Of course, one of the relatively best and easiest ways to foster their involvement in solving those problems is undoubtedly through volunteering activities.

Volunteerism, which is mostly executed through non-profit organizations, has significantly impacted the stakeholders involved, which include the non-profit themselves, as well as the communities and the youths. Nonprofits could be benefited through the expansion of missions, innovative ideas, enhanced public support, and the cultivation of new supporters and volunteers. Meanwhile, the young people could take advantage in terms of their increase of self-development, which include but not limited to responsibility, empathy, self-esteem, new social skills, improved physical and mental health, interest in learning, and other psychological and intellectual developments. The United Nations itself has recognized volunteer groups as one of the stakeholders to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, that might also considerably foster its national planning and implementation.

It could be seen that volunteerism is a prominent fuel for sustainable development, and it is highly recommended for all communities to get involved. Nonetheless, despite the aforementioned benefits of youth volunteerism, a considerable amount of young people may unfortunately still be discouraged from conducting volunteering activities, which might be caused by the lack of information, lack of time, lack of interest, and so forth. As these problems should be taken into account, volunteerism would definitely provide abundant benefits for the youths and the grass-root communities, especially in the efforts of achieving SDGs. As volunteerism was not featured in the agenda of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs), despite its significance to be implemented. Further significance and effectiveness of volunteerism could be proven by the fact that countries which have high amount of volunteers are more vibrant in terms of economic and social conditions, according to the statistics by the International Forum for Volunteering in Development. Many aspects that drive poverty could also be gradually resolved from the act of volunteering, such as education, health, employment, and livelihoods, which are the key objectives of the SDGs.

Wait no more, let’s be a volunteer to achieve SDGs hand in hand, young people!

Ready for The Age of Disruption


What I try to focus on is not to try to stop the march of technological progress. Instead, I try to run faster. If Amazon knows you better than you know yourself, then the game is up.


Yuval Noah Harari

The development of science, knowledge, and technology nowadays has gone beyond what was predicted some decades ago. The rapid advance that marked the world with a new era, namely the era of the Industry 4.0. The appearance of new technologies such as robotics, artificial intelligence, and genetic editing in biotechnology will immediately change all aspects of human life. One example of this is how technology plays a significant role in life where  the internet can connect people globally with a massive spectrum and almost without limitations, so there are many transactions starting from lifestyles, work and cultural exchange. Citations from The Economist magazine uses the term “techlash” to mark the time when technology will become the ruler, not only from a economic aspect, but also social, political and cultural aspects.

Industry 4.0 came in one package in the form of positive benefits and negative impacts. Technology indeed aims to help human activities, but it can also cause a change of life order in society called disruption. These days, Indonesia has been in the stage of disruption era. It can be seen from human resource factors from which the country is still not ready. According to data reported by the World Economic Forum (WEF) related with global competitiveness index in the 2017-2018 WEF Report, Indonesia occupied the 36th position,  raised up to 5 rank from the previous year at 41st position from 137 countries. From the data, Indonesia experienced an increase in rank, but the country is still below in comparison to Thailand (32nd), Malaysia (23rd) and Singapore (3rd). One of the causes of Indonesia remaining below those countries is due weak health and primary education pillars.Three indicators can be identified as the case can be identified as the case First, Indonesia ranks 101 out of 137 countries (Thailand 72nd, Malaysia 66, Singapore 8th) with life expectancy. Secondly, Indonesia also ranks 47 out of 137 (Thailand 89th, Malaysia 23rd, Singapore 3rd) regarding quality of primary education. Thirdly, the country also ranks 106 of 137 (Thailand 100, Malaysia 32nd, Singapore 1st) with its primary education enrollment rates.

According to the WEF, health and primary education is one out of four main pillars of the basic requirements of sustainability in society welfare of a country. Further, WEF also published a report entitled “Future of Job” which implied that to face the disruption, someone should have ten basic skills among them including : complex problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity, people management, coordinating with others, emotional intelligence, service orientation, negotiation, cognitive flexibility, judgment and decision-making. However, those basic skills should be taught early which can be difficult to obtain in Indonesian primary education.

To prepare for the challenges of the age of disruption especially in the education field, Project Child Indonesia (PCI) as a Non-Government Organization created a program called “Sekolah Sungai” (River School) in 2011. PCI realized that the current formal education in Indonesia at the present time is not optimal. This is because of the lack of distribution of education infrastructure, the need to improve teachers’ quality, and improve curriculum that is not in accordance with the need of today’s students. Therefore, the program was created to complement their existing formal education. “Sekolah Sungai” is held at three places in Yogyakarta including Kricak, Gadjah Wong and Code.

Sekolah Sungai” is a program in PCI that implements a method called Project Based Learning (PBL) which has been adjusted to the community conditions surrounding the river sites. PBL is used to prepare students for the 21st century challenges to work on real problems and solve them directly using their analytical and practical skills.Often a product or presentation can be the end-result of the project.Children are expected to work on the project during a period of time given by the facilitators. Moreover, PBL is suitable for our community classes in the spirit of alternative education as it indulges critical thinking, creativity and communication skills as supplementary skills for their education. In this batch, PBL discussed two projects named “Public Places in Your Neighborhood ” and “Literacy Project”. The first project was designed to spark the awareness of children related to their own neighborhood with them expected to find solutions to the real world problems found through their projects. The second project aims to improve children’s interest in literary works such as picture books, magazines, comics, novels, and many more. It also trains their creativity and flexibility to think and share their ideas in creative ways.

Sekolah Sungai located in Gadjah Wong, called “SS Gadjah Wong” is one of the river school sites. Acquiring basic education through formal schooling is still not yet effective, and the children in that place are not yet familiar with literacy. This added with the fairly low socio-economic conditions of the area make it challenging for the people to develop basic skills such as critical thinking, creativity and cognitive flexibility to answer the challenges of the age of disruption. Sekolah Sungai volunteers assist the children with ages varied from 6-14 years through PBL. The 10 week duration of PBL meetings showed positive results to the development of students as they became more daring to express themselves, more creative, and better able to coordinate with other people. The first project that started from the first to sixth week, was about “Public Places in Your Neighborhood”. The students were assisted by volunteers to do public place observations. It aimed to gather information about the history, function of the problems that exist, and then discuss the possible solutions related to the problems altogether. The second project called “Literacy Project”, was held on the seventh to tenth week of the meetings. It began with reading stories to children in order for them to gain exposure to literary works. After that, they were guided by volunteers to create  an outline that was to be developed as a story. Upon finishing the story, the students created literacy projects such as short stories, comics, and picture stories. During the projects, various obstacles were found however, they contribute as great insight for curriculum development, students, and the improvement of the Indonesian education system in a broader spectrum.

Written by: Ega Kusuma Ahimsa- Teaching-Learning Assessor Intern


Bibliography

https://www.economist.com/news/2013/11/18/the-coming-tech-lash

https://www.quora.com/What-does-the-techlash-mean

https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-future-of-jobs-report-2018

https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-competitiveness-report-2017-2018

Learn and Play at Desa Wisata Pulesari

The long awaited outdoor activity for this batch in river school program has finally concluded. Last Sunday, on 9th December the Code river school site went for a field trip in Desa Wisata Pulesari, Turi. The trip was something we had been planned since the beginning of this batch. As a community based NGO, it is one of our mission to bring an alternate form of education for children in order to implement our belief of a learning environment to be more fluid, flexible and fun. We have learned from our past, that formal education has been involving a lot in a facility that does not relate to recreational activities. In addition, field trip study is proved to be a prominent necessity in order to truly establish and adopt the idea of alternative education. Stones and earth are such adequate substitution of both pen and paper, and where being soaked, getting dirty and wet are regarded as a form of education.  However, the main purpose of field trip is to give a form of a reward for the children for their outstanding performance, participation, and their immense passion shown through the project activities.

There were total of 30 children and 17 volunteer and staff joining the field trip. It was an enthralling and exciting experience as the students learned how to make a traditional snack called Nogosari. The dish which comes from Java, was made from the snake fruits which are the most common plantation in the area. At the beginning, the mothers from Desa Wisata Pulesari explained the steps on how to make the traditional snack, including the main ingredients. The students were attracted to learn something they rarely or even never seen before. Furthermore, they let the students help peeling the snake fruits, making the dough, and even wrap the dough using banana leaves. It was a good experience as students can get involved in the process of cooking and got chances to ask questions.

After the cooking class, the children were enthusiastically waiting for the main activity that day, which is to go down to the river and explore the river track. There were few obstacles prepared to entertain the students as they enjoy to cross the hanging bridge, climbing through the nets, and  being in the water. As safety become our main concern during the river tracking, our volunteers were always ready to assist the children. In addition, some facts about river, plantation, vegetation, and animals that lives in the river were prepared to give the children some insight about the open river. The children were also asked to differentiate the river in their community with the river they went for tracking. The activity is to make children aware on how river could be a safe environment when it is clean and well-managed.

Lastly, the children were very delighted to know they have been granted with a field trip donation to Desa Wisata Pulesari from The Goods for Good. For the generous donation, on behalf of the children and Project Child Indonesia, we express our deepest gratitude for the continuous support and especially for the field trip surprise. An act of help or assistance, big or small, does not matter. The intention to do so, makes the difference.

SMSG VISIT: Collaboration is key in educational movement

Semua Murid Semua Guru (SMSG) is an educational organization which focuses and believes in the power of collaboration. The founder of SMSG, Najeela Shihab, is an educator and activist of education. The organization focuses on how collaboration among independent communities and organizations would have more impact rather than if the communities and organizations worked alone. Together, the communities could build a bigger impact and establish better network among each other.

Project child Indonesia (PCI) is seen as one of the NGOs which has already established the collaboration movement in their programs. Especially, the River School Program which runs as the longest program in PCI. There are a variety of collaborations among the stake holders: community members, students, volunteers, sustainable funding and involvement from volunteer abroad.

There were about 28 students from the river school site present during the visitation. The Co-founder of PCI, Surayah Ryha, and the founder of SMSG, Najeela Shihab, discussed about the importance of educational development among alternative education. There are many underrated communities who are already working on educational movements to support the government’s agenda of reforming education. These organizations, such as PCI, are already involved in this educational movement and have developed sustainable programs for quite awhile now. This good movement is something which needs to be shared among educational activists. Furthermore, there were mass medias from all across the nation who also came to visit and were interested to spread the good news.

After the visitation, PCI is given time to share about the ideas of alternative education among other communities in Green host hotel and to broaden the network by joining the networking session initiated by SMSG. The visitation held in PCI is expected to give more insight upon possible collaborations between SMSG and also other communities. The collaboration would certainly relate to the scope of Project Child Indonesia. The community development is one of the possible collaborations concerning the community members surrounding river school sites.

There are other expected outcomes from the networking sessions with SMSG and the networks within SMSG: there will be more good news about the alternative education movement in Indonesia to encourage the idea of volunteerism to people reading the news, and possible collaboration with more communities under the same movement. Most of all, establishing better networks with SMSG, media, other communities within SMSG network.

 

 

By: Filla Lavenia Palupy

Indonesia to implement literature to its education system

Literature is a part of artwork that gives human being a pleasure of playing with imagination. It’s closely associated with thoughts, feelings, and experiences, in which are important for the growth of one’s cognitive, intrapersonal, and social. In cognitive aspect, literature is strongly related in shaping a person mind-set as well as building the ability of critical thinking. Literature introduces various kinds of characters in life that will affect an individual to develop their own character. In line with intrapersonal, literature could be a media for individual to recognize norms of a society since literature is the projection of life.

Those three aspects are very beneficial if implemented in children education. It is proven from countries such as US and Japan that have been implementing literature into their school curriculum for years. Kinds of literary works that could be implemented into everyday teaching learning process are various. For example songs, poems, prose, short stories, picture books and novels. The one being main concern of Indonesian government is printed literary works. Even though Indonesia in fact is quite late in applying literature in children education and that making Indonesia has low interest in reading, the government lately has been trying to implementing literature in the education system. This can be seen from government policies that require students to read books for fifteen minutes every day before the teaching and learning process begins.

In Indonesia there are several children literature authors that have amazing works for children to read. Murti Bunanta with her Si Bungsu Katka, The Tiny Boys and Other Tales from Indonesia, and etc. She wrote her books in a way that it is easy yet so fun but still full of values and knowledge for children to enjoy and of course to learn. Various values could be taken from Bunanta’s books such as being independent; being honest; and working hard and for knowledge, Bunanta’s book is a retell from Indonesian tales, children could learn about Indonesian culture through the books. Another name is Bung Smas, who made books for children that more advanced in reading, and most of his book have the genre of mystery. His famous works are Noni the Series and Pulung the Series. Through his book, children are given the media for exploring their minds and also emotions such as happiness; sadness; grief; and lost. Those books have been the go to for teachers to engage elementary students to read.

Children have a very different world from adults. The world of children is very close to the world of imagination. Imagination for children means exploring and also understanding the reality of individual existence, and surroundings. Encouraging children to explore their imagination is needed to stimulate their mindsets in order for them to reach their maximum potential. The role of literature through literary works becomes necessary since it is proven to be able to give children the media for them building and developing their imagination.

Pasar Mandiri Code – Project Child Indonesia

On 3rd November 2018, Project Child Indonesia held Pasar Mandiri at Sekolah Sungai Code. It’s one of our most anticipated event at Sekolah Sungai, and the children of Sekolah Sungai Code were very excited in preparing and taking part in Pasar Mandiri.

The original idea of Pasar Mandiri or Sustainable Market, is to allow the riverside community to take part in the process of education for the children at our Sekolah Sungai. In Pasar Mandiri, Project Child Indonesia provides second-hand goods, with great quality and affordable price to sell. The prices range from IDR 1.000 to IDR 10.000. This affordable price range allows the community member of Code to buy all the things that they need. The money that we collected from Pasar Mandiri will directly goes to our educational field-trip for the children.

During this event, we also involved the children of Sekolah Sungai Code directly. They helped to sell, bargain and promote the clothes, bags and shoes to the community member. We involved the children on this event, because Project Child Indonesia aims to raise awareness towards the children about working hard to achieve their dreams. We want the children to understand and put their effort for what they want. And through Pasar Mandiri, they learn about this. They learn that for their educational trip, which they also get to participate in deciding the trip that they want, they have to put some effort in making it happen.

The event start at 09.00 until 12.00, around 50 people came and participated in Pasar Mandiri. We would like to thank all of our kind donors and volunteers for making this program possible.

Storytelling Day – Project Child Indonesia

In the celebration of Sumpah Pemuda, on 28th October 2018 Project Child Indonesia with DESA (Developing Rural Area by Social Activities) in collaboration with Kita Beraksi, 1000 Guru Jogja, and Yogyakarta Mengajar held an event called “Satu Hari Mendongeng Anak Indonesia” in one of our river school, Gadjahwong. The event was initiated as an effort to raise awareness about the importance of literacy in children’s life. The event combined interesting storytelling and games in order to give inspirations for the children that books can be interesting too.

The event was successfully held at 09.00 until 11.30, and was divided into two session of storytelling. The first session was a general storytelling, then on the second session the children were divided by their age group and they listened to another story. Around 27 children came and took part in this event. Instantly, they were captivated and mesmerized by the stories. They were passionate in listening and watching the storytelling.

After the first and second session, the children were given some questions regarding of the stories that they’ve just heard. The children were very enthusiastic in answering questions about the story. The question and answer session were followed with giving out the door prizes. Project Child Indonesia gave out books and school essentials for the children that could answer the questions about the stories.

At the end of the event, in the spirit of celebrating Sumpah Pemuda, the children and volunteers recited the youth pledge. Then the children received tumbler from a generous donation by Travel Lover Yogyakarta. We were so happy to conduct this event in our river school, Gadjahwong. We want to thank you for the communities that took part in our event. We hope to see similar events on other school also!